Safe-to-fail climate change adaptation strategies for phoenix roadways under extreme precipitation

Yeowon Kim, Daniel Eisenberg, Emily Bondank, Mikhail Chester, Giuseppe Mascaro, Shane Underwood

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Built infrastructure continues to become more vulnerable to failure due to shifting temperature and precipitation extremes associated with global climate change. Current infrastructure design practices require risk analysis to predict a range of weather events in which built systems endure any possible failure - or "fail-safe" design. However, if the system receives a shock that is not foreseen with the historical data, it may lead to a shutdown of the entire system and thus cause unmanageable and cascading failures. Instead, "safe-to-fail" design takes into account uncertain future threats by privileging infrastructure solutions that do not compromise the entire urban system upon failure. In this study, we link climate and urban drainage models to predict future roadway vulnerability using the EPA storm water management model (SWMM) and propose a framework for "safe-to-fail" infrastructure adaptation strategy using multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). We demonstrate the practicality of this framework for future flooding events in Phoenix, Arizona. Taken together, our new infrastructure design framework is important for managing future extreme weather events by taking into account "safe-to-fail" decision factors neglected in traditional "fail-safe" design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017
Subtitle of host publicationPolicy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages348-353
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9780784481202
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event2017 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Policy, Finance, and Education, ICSI 2017 - New York, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2017Oct 28 2017

Other

Other2017 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Policy, Finance, and Education, ICSI 2017
CountryUnited States
CityNew York
Period10/26/1710/28/17

Fingerprint

Climate change
Decision theory
Precipitation (meteorology)
Water management
Risk analysis
Drainage
Adaptation strategies
Temperature
Weather

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Kim, Y., Eisenberg, D., Bondank, E., Chester, M., Mascaro, G., & Underwood, S. (2017). Safe-to-fail climate change adaptation strategies for phoenix roadways under extreme precipitation. In International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017 (pp. 348-353). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481202.033

Safe-to-fail climate change adaptation strategies for phoenix roadways under extreme precipitation. / Kim, Yeowon; Eisenberg, Daniel; Bondank, Emily; Chester, Mikhail; Mascaro, Giuseppe; Underwood, Shane.

International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. p. 348-353.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kim, Y, Eisenberg, D, Bondank, E, Chester, M, Mascaro, G & Underwood, S 2017, Safe-to-fail climate change adaptation strategies for phoenix roadways under extreme precipitation. in International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 348-353, 2017 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Policy, Finance, and Education, ICSI 2017, New York, United States, 10/26/17. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481202.033
Kim Y, Eisenberg D, Bondank E, Chester M, Mascaro G, Underwood S. Safe-to-fail climate change adaptation strategies for phoenix roadways under extreme precipitation. In International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2017. p. 348-353 https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481202.033
Kim, Yeowon ; Eisenberg, Daniel ; Bondank, Emily ; Chester, Mikhail ; Mascaro, Giuseppe ; Underwood, Shane. / Safe-to-fail climate change adaptation strategies for phoenix roadways under extreme precipitation. International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. pp. 348-353
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