Saccharide composition in atmospheric particulate matter in the southwest US and estimates of source contributions

Yuling Jia, Andrea L. Clements, Matthew Fraser

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    52 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Saccharide compositions were measured in ambient particulate matter (PM) samples collected at four sites in Eastern Texas and Central Arizona in an effort to assess the contribution from biomass burning, atmospheric entrainment of soil, and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) in regions with different climate patterns and ecosystems. In spite of the concentration difference, samples from the four study sites showed similar saccharide composition and seasonal variation, with the only exception being trehalose, likely resulting from the influence of local climatic conditions. Comparison of samples at the Arizona site showed different saccharide enrichment patterns between PM2.5 and PM10, which is consistent with their proposed sources as determined by a correlation analysis between observations. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was used to resolve three saccharide-related source factors and their relative source contributions to ambient PM using saccharides as tracers. Both the correlation and PMF model results indicate a stronger influence from local biogenic sources on aerosol saccharides at the rural sites than the urban site in Texas, and a greater impact from the PBAP and other biologically derived sources for PM collected in the Arizona location. This paper will provide the first analysis of saccharides in both fine and coarse PM in two US regions with dramatically different climates and ecosystem and provide a characterization of the ambient aerosol sources.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)62-73
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Aerosol Science
    Volume41
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 2010

    Keywords

    • Central Arizona
    • Eastern Texas
    • PM
    • Saccharides
    • Source

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Environmental Engineering
    • Pollution
    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
    • Atmospheric Science

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