Rural and urban fatal pedestrian crashes among United States American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

Jonathon LaValley, Cameron S. Crandall, Laura Banks, David P. Sklar, Leverson Boodlal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and the Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) were used to compare fatal pedestrian crashes in American Indians and Alaskan Natives (AI/AN) between urban and rural locations for 2000-2001. There were significant differences between urban and rural crashes for driver, pedestrian, environmental, and engineering factors. Rural pedestrian crashes more often occurred on highways (p<0.0001) lacking traffic control devices (p<0.0001) and artificial lighting (p<0.0001). Alcohol was a significant cofactor in both environments (40% urban vs. 55% rural; p=0.0239). Prevention of AI/AN deaths should include engineering countermeasures specific to the needs of rural (lighting) and urban (medians with barriers) environments and address drinking behavior in both populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-143
Number of pages17
JournalAnnual proceedings / Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine. Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine
Volume47
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Rural and urban fatal pedestrian crashes among United States American Indians and Alaskan Natives.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this