Role of the C-terminal RDEL motif of the myxoma virus M-T4 protein in terms of apoptosis regulation and viral pathogenesis

Shawna Hnatiuk, Michele Barry, Wei Zeng, Liying Liu, Alexandra Lucas, Dean Percy, Douglas McFadden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the significance of the C- terminal RDEL motif of the myxoma virus M-T4 protein in terms of apoptosis regulation and role in viral virulence. To accomplish this, a recombinant myxoma virus was created in which the C-terminal RDEL motif of M-T4 was deleted and a selectable marker (Ecogpt) was inserted immediately downstream. We hypothesized that removal of the RDEL motif from M-T4 would alter the subcellular localization of the protein and provide insight into its antiapoptotic role. Surprisingly, removal of the RDEL motif from M-T4 did not affect localization of the protein within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but it did reduce the stability of the mutant protein. Pulse-chase immunoprecipitation and endoglycosidase H analysis coupled with confocal fluorescent light microscopy demonstrated that the M-T4 RDEL- mutant protein is retained in the ER like wildtype M-T4 and suggests that the C-terminal RDEL motif is not the sole determinant for M-T4 localization to the ER. Infection of cultured rabbit lymphocytes with the M-T4 RDEL- mutant virus results in an intermediate apoptosis phenotype compared with the wildtype and M-T4 knockout mutant viruses. A novel myxomatosis phenotype was observed in European rabbits when infected with the recombinant M-T4 RDELmutant virus. Rabbits infected with the M-T4 RDEL- virus on day 9 postinfection exhibited an exacerbated edematous and inflammatory response at secondary sites of infections, particularly the ears. Our results indicate that the C-terminal RDEL motif may not be solely responsible for retention of M-T4 to the ER and that M-T4 may have a dual function in protecting infected lymphocytes from apoptosis and in modulating the inflammatory response to virus infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-306
Number of pages17
JournalVirology
Volume263
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 25 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Endoplasmic Reticulum
Apoptosis
Viruses
Mutant Proteins
Rabbits
Myxoma virus
Lymphocytes
Phenotype
Glycoside Hydrolases
Virus Diseases
Coinfection
Immunoprecipitation
Ear
Virulence
Microscopy
Proteins
Light
myxoma virus M-T4 protein
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Cite this

Role of the C-terminal RDEL motif of the myxoma virus M-T4 protein in terms of apoptosis regulation and viral pathogenesis. / Hnatiuk, Shawna; Barry, Michele; Zeng, Wei; Liu, Liying; Lucas, Alexandra; Percy, Dean; McFadden, Douglas.

In: Virology, Vol. 263, No. 2, 25.10.1999, p. 290-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hnatiuk, Shawna ; Barry, Michele ; Zeng, Wei ; Liu, Liying ; Lucas, Alexandra ; Percy, Dean ; McFadden, Douglas. / Role of the C-terminal RDEL motif of the myxoma virus M-T4 protein in terms of apoptosis regulation and viral pathogenesis. In: Virology. 1999 ; Vol. 263, No. 2. pp. 290-306.
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