Role of nonexercise activity thermogenesis in resistance to fat gain in humans

James A. Levine, Norman L. Eberhardt, Michael D. Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

710 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Humans show considerable interindividual variation in susceptibility to weight gain in response to overeating. The physiological basis of this variation was investigated by measuring changes in energy storage and expenditure in 16 nonobese volunteers who were fed 1000 kilocalories per day in excess of weight-maintenance requirements for 8 weeks. Two-thirds of the increases in total daily energy expenditure was due to increased nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), which is associated with fidgeting, maintenance of posture, and other physical activities of daily life. Changes in NEAT accounted for the 10-fold differences in fat storage that occurred and directly predicted resistance to fat gain with overfeeding (correlation coefficient = 0.77, probability < 0.001). These results suggest that as humans overeat, activation of NEAT dissipates excess energy to preserve leanness and that failure to activate NEAT may result in ready fat gain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-214
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume283
Issue number5399
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 8 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Thermogenesis
Fats
Energy Metabolism
Maintenance
Hyperphagia
Thinness
Posture
Weight Gain
Volunteers
Exercise
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Role of nonexercise activity thermogenesis in resistance to fat gain in humans. / Levine, James A.; Eberhardt, Norman L.; Jensen, Michael D.

In: Science, Vol. 283, No. 5399, 08.01.1999, p. 212-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levine, James A. ; Eberhardt, Norman L. ; Jensen, Michael D. / Role of nonexercise activity thermogenesis in resistance to fat gain in humans. In: Science. 1999 ; Vol. 283, No. 5399. pp. 212-214.
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