Role of feedback, category size, and stimulus distortion on the acquisition and utilization of ill-defined categories

Donald Homa, Joan C. Cultice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

In Exp I, 192 undergraduates classified either low-, medium-, high-, or mixed-level distortions under feedback or no-feedback training and then received a common transfer test containing old, new, prototype, and unrelated stimuli. In Exp II (with 80 Ss), the training patterns were multidimensionally scaled, and a measure of categorical structure was derived for each training condition. Results indicate that feedback training was consistently superior to no-feedback conditions and that category size was important only for feedback conditions. Minimal learning occurred in the no-feedback conditions, except when the training set was highly structured. A simple relationship is proposed, relating ease of learning to the degree of categorical structure. The benefits of feedback are discussed in terms of choice reduction and schema formation, with the latter viewed as instrumental in preventing the formation of idiosyncratic groupings based on adventitious feature similarities in patterns from other categories. (25 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-94
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Keywords

  • category size &
  • feedback vs no-feedback &
  • stimulus distortion level, learning &
  • transfer of poorly-defined categories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Role of feedback, category size, and stimulus distortion on the acquisition and utilization of ill-defined categories'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this