Risky Driving Behavior: A Consequence of Motion Adaptation for Visually Guided Motor Action

Robert Gray, David Regan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined the effect of adaptation to expansion on overtaking maneuvers ma driving simulator. Following driving on a straight empty road for 5 min, drivers initiated overtaking substantially later (220-510 ms) than comparable maneuvers made following viewing a static scene or following 5 min of curve driving. Following adaptation to contraction (produced by driving backward), observers initiated overtaking significantly sooner. The removal of the road texture significantly reduced the size of the adaptation effect. The authors propose that these changes in overtaking behavior are due to misestimation of the time headway produced by local adaptation of looming detectors that signal motion-in-depth for objects near the focus of expansion. This adaptation effect may increase the risk of rear-end collisions during highway driving.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1721-1732
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume26
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Roads
Texture
Simulator
Contraction
Observer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

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