Risk factors for low birth weight infants of hispanic, African American, and white women in Bexar County, Texas: Populations at risk across the lifespan: Empirical studies

Rosalie Tierney-Gumaer, Elizabeth Reifsnider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the risk factors in women who delivered an infant of low birth weight (LBW, <2,500 g) versus women who delivered an infant weighing >2,500 g in a large metropolitan county (Bexar) in South Texas. Design: An exploratory case comparison design was used to identify factors related to LBW outcomes in women receiving prenatal care. Sample: The cases were obtained from community hospitals. A stratified random sample was selected from a population of 38,064 infant births, of which 2,910 were identified as LBW. The final sample size was N=321 (<2,500 g, n=151; ≥2,500 g, n=170). Measurements: Dependent variable of infant birth weight; independent variables of maternal age, maternal race/ethnicity, education, smoking, prior pregnancy history, timing of and number of prenatal visits, prepregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy, and past medical history and medical problems during pregnancy. Results: Independent variables found to be predictive of LBW in this study included maternal race/ethnicity, timing of first prenatal visit, number of prenatal visits, prior pregnancy history, and maternal weight gain. Conclusions: This study confirmed previous findings that African American women are at a higher risk for LBW deliveries and demonstrated that Anglo and Hispanic women have similar rates of LBW deliveries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-400
Number of pages11
JournalPublic Health Nursing
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Low Birth Weight Infant
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Reproductive History
Mothers
Weight Gain
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Community Hospital
Maternal Age
Birth Weight
Sample Size
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Parturition
Education
Population

Keywords

  • Low birth weight
  • Minority health
  • Prenatal care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{eb7e7f4a30134e2dad74aeac2a3059b0,
title = "Risk factors for low birth weight infants of hispanic, African American, and white women in Bexar County, Texas: Populations at risk across the lifespan: Empirical studies",
abstract = "Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the risk factors in women who delivered an infant of low birth weight (LBW, <2,500 g) versus women who delivered an infant weighing >2,500 g in a large metropolitan county (Bexar) in South Texas. Design: An exploratory case comparison design was used to identify factors related to LBW outcomes in women receiving prenatal care. Sample: The cases were obtained from community hospitals. A stratified random sample was selected from a population of 38,064 infant births, of which 2,910 were identified as LBW. The final sample size was N=321 (<2,500 g, n=151; ≥2,500 g, n=170). Measurements: Dependent variable of infant birth weight; independent variables of maternal age, maternal race/ethnicity, education, smoking, prior pregnancy history, timing of and number of prenatal visits, prepregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy, and past medical history and medical problems during pregnancy. Results: Independent variables found to be predictive of LBW in this study included maternal race/ethnicity, timing of first prenatal visit, number of prenatal visits, prior pregnancy history, and maternal weight gain. Conclusions: This study confirmed previous findings that African American women are at a higher risk for LBW deliveries and demonstrated that Anglo and Hispanic women have similar rates of LBW deliveries.",
keywords = "Low birth weight, Minority health, Prenatal care",
author = "Rosalie Tierney-Gumaer and Elizabeth Reifsnider",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/j.1525-1446.2008.00723.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "390--400",
journal = "Public Health Nursing",
issn = "0737-1209",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors for low birth weight infants of hispanic, African American, and white women in Bexar County, Texas

T2 - Populations at risk across the lifespan: Empirical studies

AU - Tierney-Gumaer, Rosalie

AU - Reifsnider, Elizabeth

PY - 2008/9

Y1 - 2008/9

N2 - Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the risk factors in women who delivered an infant of low birth weight (LBW, <2,500 g) versus women who delivered an infant weighing >2,500 g in a large metropolitan county (Bexar) in South Texas. Design: An exploratory case comparison design was used to identify factors related to LBW outcomes in women receiving prenatal care. Sample: The cases were obtained from community hospitals. A stratified random sample was selected from a population of 38,064 infant births, of which 2,910 were identified as LBW. The final sample size was N=321 (<2,500 g, n=151; ≥2,500 g, n=170). Measurements: Dependent variable of infant birth weight; independent variables of maternal age, maternal race/ethnicity, education, smoking, prior pregnancy history, timing of and number of prenatal visits, prepregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy, and past medical history and medical problems during pregnancy. Results: Independent variables found to be predictive of LBW in this study included maternal race/ethnicity, timing of first prenatal visit, number of prenatal visits, prior pregnancy history, and maternal weight gain. Conclusions: This study confirmed previous findings that African American women are at a higher risk for LBW deliveries and demonstrated that Anglo and Hispanic women have similar rates of LBW deliveries.

AB - Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the risk factors in women who delivered an infant of low birth weight (LBW, <2,500 g) versus women who delivered an infant weighing >2,500 g in a large metropolitan county (Bexar) in South Texas. Design: An exploratory case comparison design was used to identify factors related to LBW outcomes in women receiving prenatal care. Sample: The cases were obtained from community hospitals. A stratified random sample was selected from a population of 38,064 infant births, of which 2,910 were identified as LBW. The final sample size was N=321 (<2,500 g, n=151; ≥2,500 g, n=170). Measurements: Dependent variable of infant birth weight; independent variables of maternal age, maternal race/ethnicity, education, smoking, prior pregnancy history, timing of and number of prenatal visits, prepregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy, and past medical history and medical problems during pregnancy. Results: Independent variables found to be predictive of LBW in this study included maternal race/ethnicity, timing of first prenatal visit, number of prenatal visits, prior pregnancy history, and maternal weight gain. Conclusions: This study confirmed previous findings that African American women are at a higher risk for LBW deliveries and demonstrated that Anglo and Hispanic women have similar rates of LBW deliveries.

KW - Low birth weight

KW - Minority health

KW - Prenatal care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=50049105771&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=50049105771&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1525-1446.2008.00723.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1525-1446.2008.00723.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 18816356

AN - SCOPUS:50049105771

VL - 25

SP - 390

EP - 400

JO - Public Health Nursing

JF - Public Health Nursing

SN - 0737-1209

IS - 5

ER -