Risk assessment for cardiovascular and respiratory mortality due to air pollution and synoptic meteorology in 10 Canadian cities

Jennifer K. Vanos, Christopher Hebbern, Sabit Cakmak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

Synoptic weather and ambient air quality synergistically influence human health. We report the relative risk of mortality from all non-accidental, respiratory-, and cardiovascular-related causes, associated with exposure to four air pollutants, by weather type and season, in 10 major Canadian cities for 1981 through 1999. We conducted this multi-city time-series study using Poisson generalized linear models stratified by season and each of six distinctive synoptic weather types. Statistically significant relationships of mortality due to short-term exposure to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and ozone were found, with significant modifications of risk by weather type, season, and mortality cause. In total, 61% of the respiratory-related mortality relative risk estimates were significantly higher than for cardiovascular- related mortality. The combined effect of weather and air pollution is greatest when tropical-type weather is present in the spring or summer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-332
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume185
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Cardiovascular
  • Mortality
  • Relative risk
  • Respiratory
  • Spatial synoptic classification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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