Right diagnosis, wrong care

patient management reasoning errors in emergency care computer-based case simulations.

Guido F. Schauer, David J. Robinson, Vimla Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The pervasiveness of reasoning errors in emergency care (EC) is commonly acknowledged in clinical research. Much of this work has focused on diagnostic errors; yet, in EC, providing a specific diagnosis is generally secondary to managing the patient. To gain insights into non-diagnostic, treatment-related errors, we presented EC residents with computer-based case simulations and recorded their actions and verbalized thoughts. Nearly all participants diagnosed both study cases correctly yet made a variety of patient management errors, some with serious consequences. More substantial errors could be classified as stemming from incorrect patient status and treatment inferences. These EC reasoning errors are discussed within the framework of underlying cognitive processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1224-1232
Number of pages9
JournalAMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium
Volume2011
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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Patient Care Management
Emergency Medical Services
Diagnostic Errors
Therapeutics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Right diagnosis, wrong care : patient management reasoning errors in emergency care computer-based case simulations. / Schauer, Guido F.; Robinson, David J.; Patel, Vimla.

In: AMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium, Vol. 2011, 01.12.2011, p. 1224-1232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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