Revisiting Psychological Mechanisms in the Anthropology of Altruism

Joseph Hackman, Shirajum Munira, Khaleda Jasmin, Daniel Hruschka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anthropologists have long been interested in the reasons humans choose to help some individuals and not others. Early research considered psychological mediators, such as feelings of cohesion or closeness, but more recent work, largely in the tradition of human behavioral ecology, shifted attention away from psychological measures to clearer observables, such as past behavior, genetic relatedness, affinal ties, and geographic proximity. In this paper, we assess the value of reintegrating psychological measures—perceived social closeness—into the anthropological study of altruism. Specifically, analyzing social network data from four communities in rural Bangladesh (N = 516), we show that perceived closeness has a strong independent effect on helping, which cannot be accounted for by other factors. These results illustrate the potential value of reintegrating proximate psychological measures into anthropological studies of human cooperation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalHuman Nature
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 28 2016

Fingerprint

altruism
anthropology
behavioral ecology
social network
relatedness
group cohesion
cohesion
Bangladesh
ecology
community
social networks
rural communities
genetic relationships
co-operation
effect
Anthropology
Altruism
Psychological
Closeness

Keywords

  • Altruism
  • Emotional closeness
  • Friendship
  • Helping
  • Social closeness
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Revisiting Psychological Mechanisms in the Anthropology of Altruism. / Hackman, Joseph; Munira, Shirajum; Jasmin, Khaleda; Hruschka, Daniel.

In: Human Nature, 28.10.2016, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hackman, Joseph ; Munira, Shirajum ; Jasmin, Khaleda ; Hruschka, Daniel. / Revisiting Psychological Mechanisms in the Anthropology of Altruism. In: Human Nature. 2016 ; pp. 1-16.
@article{4579adc144d64b8ea3c44d14cdb812a0,
title = "Revisiting Psychological Mechanisms in the Anthropology of Altruism",
abstract = "Anthropologists have long been interested in the reasons humans choose to help some individuals and not others. Early research considered psychological mediators, such as feelings of cohesion or closeness, but more recent work, largely in the tradition of human behavioral ecology, shifted attention away from psychological measures to clearer observables, such as past behavior, genetic relatedness, affinal ties, and geographic proximity. In this paper, we assess the value of reintegrating psychological measures—perceived social closeness—into the anthropological study of altruism. Specifically, analyzing social network data from four communities in rural Bangladesh (N = 516), we show that perceived closeness has a strong independent effect on helping, which cannot be accounted for by other factors. These results illustrate the potential value of reintegrating proximate psychological measures into anthropological studies of human cooperation.",
keywords = "Altruism, Emotional closeness, Friendship, Helping, Social closeness, Social networks",
author = "Joseph Hackman and Shirajum Munira and Khaleda Jasmin and Daniel Hruschka",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1007/s12110-016-9278-3",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--16",
journal = "Human Nature",
issn = "1045-6767",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Revisiting Psychological Mechanisms in the Anthropology of Altruism

AU - Hackman, Joseph

AU - Munira, Shirajum

AU - Jasmin, Khaleda

AU - Hruschka, Daniel

PY - 2016/10/28

Y1 - 2016/10/28

N2 - Anthropologists have long been interested in the reasons humans choose to help some individuals and not others. Early research considered psychological mediators, such as feelings of cohesion or closeness, but more recent work, largely in the tradition of human behavioral ecology, shifted attention away from psychological measures to clearer observables, such as past behavior, genetic relatedness, affinal ties, and geographic proximity. In this paper, we assess the value of reintegrating psychological measures—perceived social closeness—into the anthropological study of altruism. Specifically, analyzing social network data from four communities in rural Bangladesh (N = 516), we show that perceived closeness has a strong independent effect on helping, which cannot be accounted for by other factors. These results illustrate the potential value of reintegrating proximate psychological measures into anthropological studies of human cooperation.

AB - Anthropologists have long been interested in the reasons humans choose to help some individuals and not others. Early research considered psychological mediators, such as feelings of cohesion or closeness, but more recent work, largely in the tradition of human behavioral ecology, shifted attention away from psychological measures to clearer observables, such as past behavior, genetic relatedness, affinal ties, and geographic proximity. In this paper, we assess the value of reintegrating psychological measures—perceived social closeness—into the anthropological study of altruism. Specifically, analyzing social network data from four communities in rural Bangladesh (N = 516), we show that perceived closeness has a strong independent effect on helping, which cannot be accounted for by other factors. These results illustrate the potential value of reintegrating proximate psychological measures into anthropological studies of human cooperation.

KW - Altruism

KW - Emotional closeness

KW - Friendship

KW - Helping

KW - Social closeness

KW - Social networks

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84992702855&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84992702855&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12110-016-9278-3

DO - 10.1007/s12110-016-9278-3

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 16

JO - Human Nature

JF - Human Nature

SN - 1045-6767

ER -