Revisiting light trapping in silicon solar cells with random pyramids

Salman Manzoor, Miha Filipic, Marko Topic, Zachary Holman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Random pyramids are the most widely used texture in monocrystalline silicon solar cells for reducing front- surface reflection and trapping weakly absorbed light. In prior efforts to evaluate the light-trapping performance of random pyramids through optical simulations, the base angle of the pyramids was assumed to be 54.7°, as is expected from the orientation of the crystallographic planes. In this contribution, we benchmark the light-trapping capability of real random pyramids - which have a distribution of base angles - against both ideal, 54.7° random pyramids, and a Lambertian scatterer. We do so by calculating the path length enhancement and fraction of rays remaining trapped as a function of passes through the wafer, and this information is used to calculate short- circuit current density as a function of wafer thickness. Interestingly, the excellent performance of real random pyramids - they are close to Lambertian - arises precisely because they are imperfect and have a distribution of angles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 IEEE 44th Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1-3
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9781509056057
DOIs
StatePublished - May 25 2018
Event44th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017 - Washington, United States
Duration: Jun 25 2017Jun 30 2017

Other

Other44th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017
CountryUnited States
CityWashington
Period6/25/176/30/17

Fingerprint

Silicon solar cells
Monocrystalline silicon
Short circuit currents
Current density
Textures

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Light trapping
  • Photovoltaic cells
  • Ray tracing
  • Silicon
  • Surface morphology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Manzoor, S., Filipic, M., Topic, M., & Holman, Z. (2018). Revisiting light trapping in silicon solar cells with random pyramids. In 2017 IEEE 44th Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017 (pp. 1-3). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/PVSC.2017.8366697

Revisiting light trapping in silicon solar cells with random pyramids. / Manzoor, Salman; Filipic, Miha; Topic, Marko; Holman, Zachary.

2017 IEEE 44th Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. p. 1-3.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Manzoor, S, Filipic, M, Topic, M & Holman, Z 2018, Revisiting light trapping in silicon solar cells with random pyramids. in 2017 IEEE 44th Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 1-3, 44th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017, Washington, United States, 6/25/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/PVSC.2017.8366697
Manzoor S, Filipic M, Topic M, Holman Z. Revisiting light trapping in silicon solar cells with random pyramids. In 2017 IEEE 44th Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2018. p. 1-3 https://doi.org/10.1109/PVSC.2017.8366697
Manzoor, Salman ; Filipic, Miha ; Topic, Marko ; Holman, Zachary. / Revisiting light trapping in silicon solar cells with random pyramids. 2017 IEEE 44th Photovoltaic Specialist Conference, PVSC 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. pp. 1-3
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