Revisiting glucose regulation in birds – A negative model of diabetes complications

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Birds naturally have blood glucose concentrations that are nearly double levels measured for mammals of similar body size and studies have shown that birds are resistant to insulin-mediated glucose uptake into tissues. While a combination of high blood glucose and insulin resistance is associated with diabetes-related pathologies in mammals, birds do not develop such complications. Moreover, studies have shown that birds are resistant to oxidative stress and protein glycation and in fact, live longer than similar-sized mammals. This review seeks to explore how birds regulate blood glucose as well as various theories that might explain their apparent resistance to insulin-mediated glucose uptake and adaptations that enable them to thrive in a state of relative hyperglycemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number110778
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part - B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume262
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2022

Keywords

  • Avian
  • Bird
  • Diabetes
  • Glucose
  • GLUT4
  • Insulin
  • Insulin resistance
  • Oxidative stress
  • Review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology

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