Revealing local failed supernovae with neutrino telescopes

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Abstract

We study the detectability of neutrino bursts from nearby direct black hole-forming collapses (failed supernovae) at Megaton (Mt) detectors. Because of their high energetics, these bursts could be identified-by the time coincidence of N2 or N3 events within a ∼1s time window-from as far as ∼4-5Mpc away. This distance encloses several supernova-rich galaxies, so that failed supernova bursts could be detected at a rate of up to one per decade, comparable to the expected rate of the more common, but less energetic, neutron star-forming collapses. Thus, the detection of a failed supernova within the lifetime of a Mt detector is realistic. It might give the first evidence of direct black hole formation, with important implications on the physics of this phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number063002
JournalPhysical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology
Volume84
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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supernovae
neutrinos
telescopes
bursts
detectors
neutron stars
galaxies
life (durability)
physics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics

Cite this

Revealing local failed supernovae with neutrino telescopes. / Yang, Lili; Lunardini, Cecilia.

In: Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology, Vol. 84, No. 6, 063002, 01.09.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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