Retrieving against the flow: Incoherence between optic flow and movement direction has little effect on memory for order

Emiliano Díez, Antonio M. Díez-Álamo, Dominika Z. Wojcik, Arthur Glenberg, Angel Fernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research from multiple areas in neuroscience suggests a link between self-locomotion and memory. In two free recall experiments with adults, we looked for a link between (a) memory, and (b) the coherence of movement and optic flow. In both experiments, participants heard lists of words while on a treadmill and wearing a virtual reality (VR) headset. In the first experiment, the VR scene and treadmill were stationary during encoding. During retrieval, all participants walked forward, but the VR scene was stationary, moved forward, or moved backwards. In the second experiment, during encoding all participants walked forward and viewed a forward-moving VR scene. During retrieval, all participants continued to walk forward but the VR scene was stationary, forward-moving, or backward-moving. In neither experiment was there a significant difference in the amount recalled, or output order strategies, attributable to differences in movement conditions. Thus, any effects of movement on memory are more limited than theories of hippocampal function and theories in cognitive psychology anticipate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2018

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Optic Flow
Locomotion
Neurosciences
Psychology
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Keywords

  • Cognitive neuroscience
  • Hippocampus
  • Memory
  • Self-locomotion
  • Theta rhythm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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Retrieving against the flow : Incoherence between optic flow and movement direction has little effect on memory for order. / Díez, Emiliano; Díez-Álamo, Antonio M.; Wojcik, Dominika Z.; Glenberg, Arthur; Fernandez, Angel.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 12, 102, 26.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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