Retrieval of quantitative and qualitative information about plant pigment systems from high resolution spectroscopy

Susan L. Ustin, Gregory P. Asner, John A. Gamon, K. Fred Huemmrich, Stéphane Jacquemoud, Michael Schaepman, Pablo Zarco-Tejada

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Life on earth depends on photosynthesis. Photosynthetic systems evolved early in earth history and have been stable for 2.5 billion years, providing prima facie evidence for these significance of evolutionary functions. Pigments perform multiple plant functions from increasing the range of energy captured for photosynthesis to a range of protective functions. Given the importance of pigments to leaf functioning, greater effort is needed to determine whether individual pigments can be identified and quantified by high fidelity spectroscopy. New methods to identify overlapping pigment absorptions would provide a major advance for understanding plant functions, quantifying net carbon exchange, and identifying plant stresses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2006 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS
Pages1996-1999
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event2006 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Jul 31 2006Aug 4 2006

Publication series

NameInternational Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS)

Other

Other2006 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period7/31/068/4/06

Keywords

  • Absorption features
  • Anthocyanin pigments
  • Carotenes
  • Chlorophyll a,b
  • Leutin
  • Plant pigments
  • Spectral measures of pigments
  • Xanthophyll

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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