Rethinking race, gender and citizenship: Black West Indian women in Costa Rica, c. 1920-1940

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article brings Afro-Caribbean women to the fore of a discussion of Costa Rican citizenship. It explores the relationship between ideologies of gender, imageries of black womanhood, and the dialectic of citizenship and exclusion. It examines how the efforts of the black elite to achieve citizenship through assimilation generated inter-class tension which centred on ideas of female morality. It explores the absence of political platforms for poor black women excluded by such strategies and argues that while Costa Rican feminists succeeded in challenging the ideological system of gender they failed to challenge issues of race and class.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-212
Number of pages15
JournalBulletin of Latin American Research
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Afro-Caribbeans
  • Citizenship
  • Class
  • Community
  • Costa Rica
  • Gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development

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