Resveratrol potentiates vitamin D and nuclear receptor signaling

Angelika Dampf Stone, Shane F. Batie, Marya S. Sabir, Elizabeth T. Jacobs, Jamie H. Lee, G. Kerr Whitfield, Mark R. Haussler, Peter Jurutka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D<inf>3</inf> (1,25D) hormone is derived from vitamin D generated in skin or obtained from the diet, and binds to and activates the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in target tissues including kidney, colon/small intestine, and bone/muscle. We tested resveratrol for its ability to modulate VDR signaling, using vitamin D responsive element (VDRE) and mammalian 2-hybrid (M2H) transcriptional system technology. Via VDRE-based assays in kidney, colon and myoblast cells, VDR-mediated transcription was activated by resveratrol, and a cooperative effect on transactivation was observed with resveratrol plus 1,25D. The M2H assay revealed a modest, resveratrol-induced dimerization of VDR with its retinoid X receptor (RXR) heteropartner. Cells treated with both resveratrol and 1,25D displayed synergistic stimulation of VDR-RXR heterodimerization, while resveratrol antagonized rexinoid-mediated RXR-RXR homodimerization. Increased transactivation in response to resveratrol was also observed with a subset of other nuclear receptors and their respective cognate responsive elements. Evaluation of wild-type versus a ligand-binding domain mutant VDR revealed that hormone-responsiveness to 1,25D was severely depressed, while the response to resveratrol was only moderately attenuated. Moreover, radiolabeled 1,25D-displacement assays demonstrated an increase in VDR-bound 1,25D in the presence of resveratrol. Thus, resveratrol may affect VDR and other nuclear receptors indirectly, likely via the ability of resveratrol to: (1) potentiate 1,25D binding to VDR; (2) activate RXR; and/or (3) stimulate SIRT1, an enzyme known to deacetylate nuclear receptors. The results of this study elucidate a possible pathway for crosstalk between two nutritionally derived lipids, vitamin D and resveratrol, both of which converge on VDR signaling. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 1130-1143, 2015.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1130-1143
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Cellular Biochemistry
Volume116
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Calcitriol Receptors
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Calcitriol
Retinoid X Receptors
Vitamin D
Assays
Transcriptional Activation
resveratrol
Colon
Hormones
Ergocalciferols
Kidney
Dimerization
Myoblasts
Transcription
Nutrition
Crosstalk
Hybrid systems
Small Intestine
Muscle

Keywords

  • ACETYLATION
  • NUTRACEUTICAL
  • SIRT1
  • TRANSACTIVATION
  • VITAMIN D RECEPTOR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Dampf Stone, A., Batie, S. F., Sabir, M. S., Jacobs, E. T., Lee, J. H., Whitfield, G. K., ... Jurutka, P. (2015). Resveratrol potentiates vitamin D and nuclear receptor signaling. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 116(6), 1130-1143. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcb.25070

Resveratrol potentiates vitamin D and nuclear receptor signaling. / Dampf Stone, Angelika; Batie, Shane F.; Sabir, Marya S.; Jacobs, Elizabeth T.; Lee, Jamie H.; Whitfield, G. Kerr; Haussler, Mark R.; Jurutka, Peter.

In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, Vol. 116, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 1130-1143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dampf Stone, A, Batie, SF, Sabir, MS, Jacobs, ET, Lee, JH, Whitfield, GK, Haussler, MR & Jurutka, P 2015, 'Resveratrol potentiates vitamin D and nuclear receptor signaling', Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 116, no. 6, pp. 1130-1143. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcb.25070
Dampf Stone A, Batie SF, Sabir MS, Jacobs ET, Lee JH, Whitfield GK et al. Resveratrol potentiates vitamin D and nuclear receptor signaling. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2015 Jun 1;116(6):1130-1143. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcb.25070
Dampf Stone, Angelika ; Batie, Shane F. ; Sabir, Marya S. ; Jacobs, Elizabeth T. ; Lee, Jamie H. ; Whitfield, G. Kerr ; Haussler, Mark R. ; Jurutka, Peter. / Resveratrol potentiates vitamin D and nuclear receptor signaling. In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2015 ; Vol. 116, No. 6. pp. 1130-1143.
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