Resting-State Functional Connectivity Differences in College Students with and without Food Insecurity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate cross-sectional differences in functional connectivity across cognitive networks at rest among age and sex matched college students with very low food security [food insecurity (FI); n = 20] and with high food security (n = 20). The participants completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-2 (BRIEF-2) and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) questionnaires. Seven-minute resting-state fMRI scans were collected. Independent Component Analysis assessed group connectivity differences in three large-scale networks: the default-mode network (DMN), the frontoparietal network (FPN), and the salience network (SN). FI was associated with poorer Global BRIEF scores (adjusted β = 8.36; 95% CI: 2.32, 14.40) and five BRIEF subscales: Inhibit, Initiate, Working Memory, Plan, and Organize (p-values < 0.05). The students with FI had greater functional connectivity between the FPN and left middle temporal gyrus (cluster size p-FWE = 0.029), the SN and precuneus (cluster size p-FWE < 0.001), and the SN and right middle frontal gyrus (cluster size p-FWE = 0.016) compared to the students with high food security. Exploratory correlations revealed that greater connectivity between the SN and right middle frontal gyrus was associated with poorer BRIEF Inhibit scores (p = 0.038), and greater connectivity between the FPN and left middle temporal gyrus was associated with poorer BRIEF Organize scores (p = 0.024) for the students with FI. Greater functional connectivity between the FPN, DMN, and SN at rest may contribute to executive function difficulties for college students with FI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2064
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2022

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • college students
  • default-mode network
  • executive function
  • fMRI
  • food insecurity
  • frontoparietal network
  • functional connectivity
  • resting-state
  • salience network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Resting-State Functional Connectivity Differences in College Students with and without Food Insecurity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this