Response of southern magnolia to supraoptimal root-zone temperatures

Chris Martin, Dewayne L. Ingram, Matthew A. Jenks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. 1.|Rooted cuttings of southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora Hort. 'St. Mary') were exposed for 6 h daily to root-zone temperatures (RZT) of 28, 35 or 42°C for 8 weeks during the spring or fall of 1988. 2. 2.|Length of survival for 8-month old rooted cuttings was shortened when roots were exposed during the spring to 42 or 35°C compared to 28°C. Survival of 13-month old trees was unaffected by RZT treatments applied during the fall. 3. 3.|Electrolyte leakage from excised root tissue exposed for 30 min to temperatures ranging from 25 to 70°C, was used to assess cellular injury of 13-month old rooted cuttings after RZT treatments. 4. 4.|The critical killing temperatures (CT50) of root tissue pretreated at 28, 35 or 42°C RZT were 52.5 ± 0.9°C, 54.0 ± 0.4°C, respectively, and indicated differences in root membrane thermostability. 5. 5.|In another experiment, histological and scanning electron microscopy studies showed the proliferation of cells that was probably a callus response to temperature-mediated root injury induced by 38 or 42°C RZT after 20 or 8 days, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-285
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Thermal Biology
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Magnolia grandiflora
Magnolia
root zone temperature
Temperature
temperature
thermal stability
electrolytes
Tissue
cell proliferation
callus
scanning electron microscopy
Wounds and Injuries
Bony Callus
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Electrolytes
Cell Proliferation
Membranes
Scanning electron microscopy

Keywords

  • Direct heat injury
  • growth anomalies
  • Magnolia grandiflora
  • membrane thermostability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Physiology

Cite this

Response of southern magnolia to supraoptimal root-zone temperatures. / Martin, Chris; Ingram, Dewayne L.; Jenks, Matthew A.

In: Journal of Thermal Biology, Vol. 16, No. 5, 1991, p. 281-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, Chris ; Ingram, Dewayne L. ; Jenks, Matthew A. / Response of southern magnolia to supraoptimal root-zone temperatures. In: Journal of Thermal Biology. 1991 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 281-285.
@article{436908ce080442508cf6bfeae1021e8a,
title = "Response of southern magnolia to supraoptimal root-zone temperatures",
abstract = "1. 1.|Rooted cuttings of southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora Hort. 'St. Mary') were exposed for 6 h daily to root-zone temperatures (RZT) of 28, 35 or 42°C for 8 weeks during the spring or fall of 1988. 2. 2.|Length of survival for 8-month old rooted cuttings was shortened when roots were exposed during the spring to 42 or 35°C compared to 28°C. Survival of 13-month old trees was unaffected by RZT treatments applied during the fall. 3. 3.|Electrolyte leakage from excised root tissue exposed for 30 min to temperatures ranging from 25 to 70°C, was used to assess cellular injury of 13-month old rooted cuttings after RZT treatments. 4. 4.|The critical killing temperatures (CT50) of root tissue pretreated at 28, 35 or 42°C RZT were 52.5 ± 0.9°C, 54.0 ± 0.4°C, respectively, and indicated differences in root membrane thermostability. 5. 5.|In another experiment, histological and scanning electron microscopy studies showed the proliferation of cells that was probably a callus response to temperature-mediated root injury induced by 38 or 42°C RZT after 20 or 8 days, respectively.",
keywords = "Direct heat injury, growth anomalies, Magnolia grandiflora, membrane thermostability",
author = "Chris Martin and Ingram, {Dewayne L.} and Jenks, {Matthew A.}",
year = "1991",
doi = "10.1016/0306-4565(91)90018-W",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "281--285",
journal = "Journal of Thermal Biology",
issn = "0306-4565",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Response of southern magnolia to supraoptimal root-zone temperatures

AU - Martin, Chris

AU - Ingram, Dewayne L.

AU - Jenks, Matthew A.

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - 1. 1.|Rooted cuttings of southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora Hort. 'St. Mary') were exposed for 6 h daily to root-zone temperatures (RZT) of 28, 35 or 42°C for 8 weeks during the spring or fall of 1988. 2. 2.|Length of survival for 8-month old rooted cuttings was shortened when roots were exposed during the spring to 42 or 35°C compared to 28°C. Survival of 13-month old trees was unaffected by RZT treatments applied during the fall. 3. 3.|Electrolyte leakage from excised root tissue exposed for 30 min to temperatures ranging from 25 to 70°C, was used to assess cellular injury of 13-month old rooted cuttings after RZT treatments. 4. 4.|The critical killing temperatures (CT50) of root tissue pretreated at 28, 35 or 42°C RZT were 52.5 ± 0.9°C, 54.0 ± 0.4°C, respectively, and indicated differences in root membrane thermostability. 5. 5.|In another experiment, histological and scanning electron microscopy studies showed the proliferation of cells that was probably a callus response to temperature-mediated root injury induced by 38 or 42°C RZT after 20 or 8 days, respectively.

AB - 1. 1.|Rooted cuttings of southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora Hort. 'St. Mary') were exposed for 6 h daily to root-zone temperatures (RZT) of 28, 35 or 42°C for 8 weeks during the spring or fall of 1988. 2. 2.|Length of survival for 8-month old rooted cuttings was shortened when roots were exposed during the spring to 42 or 35°C compared to 28°C. Survival of 13-month old trees was unaffected by RZT treatments applied during the fall. 3. 3.|Electrolyte leakage from excised root tissue exposed for 30 min to temperatures ranging from 25 to 70°C, was used to assess cellular injury of 13-month old rooted cuttings after RZT treatments. 4. 4.|The critical killing temperatures (CT50) of root tissue pretreated at 28, 35 or 42°C RZT were 52.5 ± 0.9°C, 54.0 ± 0.4°C, respectively, and indicated differences in root membrane thermostability. 5. 5.|In another experiment, histological and scanning electron microscopy studies showed the proliferation of cells that was probably a callus response to temperature-mediated root injury induced by 38 or 42°C RZT after 20 or 8 days, respectively.

KW - Direct heat injury

KW - growth anomalies

KW - Magnolia grandiflora

KW - membrane thermostability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0344327945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0344327945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0306-4565(91)90018-W

DO - 10.1016/0306-4565(91)90018-W

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0344327945

VL - 16

SP - 281

EP - 285

JO - Journal of Thermal Biology

JF - Journal of Thermal Biology

SN - 0306-4565

IS - 5

ER -