Response of Antarctic terrestrial microarthropods to long-term climate manipulations

P. Convey, P. J A Pugh, C. Jackson, A. W. Murray, C. T. Ruhland, F. S. Xiong, Thomas Day

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The terrestrial biota of the Antarctic Peninsula region are experiencing marked changes in climate, especially rising temperatures, precipitation, and UV-B radiation - a combination unique worldwide. These changes, combined with the inherent simplicity of terrestrial communities, have led to their use as "model systems" to predict the future climate change responses of biota at lower latitudes. However, studies integrating responses at different levels of the community trophic structure are lacking. We report here the consequences on the soil microarthropod community of a four-year, multivariate, climate-manipulation experiment carried out over vegetation near Palmer Station, Anvers Island, western Antarctic Peninsula. The experiment used a multifactorial randomized-block design, deploying filters to raise temperatures and reduce ultraviolet (UV)-B (280-320 nm) or both UV-B and UV-A (320-400 nm) radiation of existing vegetation, with further water and fertilizer amendment treatments. Seven microarthropod species recovered in sufficient numbers for statistical analyses showed considerable spatial aggregation independent of treatment, a feature typical of many soil invertebrates. Analyses using negative binomial generalized linear modeling identified further significant and consistent treatment impacts on both individual species and species groups. Relative to controls, manipulations increasing temperature decreased numbers of microarthropods (particularly Collembola), as did exposure to near-ambient levels of UV radiation (separate significant effects for both UV-A and UV-B), while water amendment increased numbers. The impacts of temperature and water are consistent with our understanding of the importance of these two environmental variables and their interaction in Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems. The negative impact of UV (-A or -B) on arthropod heterotroph and detritivore populations in the Antarctic terrestrial food web is likely to be a secondary consequence of UV impact on vegetation characteristics. This is, again, consistent With general predictions of the impact of changing UV climate on ecosystem function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3130-3140
Number of pages11
JournalEcology
Volume83
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

Fingerprint

ultraviolet radiation
climate
biota
vegetation
temperature
ultraviolet B radiation
trophic structure
ecosystem function
terrestrial ecosystem
water
arthropod
food web
soil
experiment
invertebrate
fertilizer
climate change
soil food webs
filter
soil invertebrates

Keywords

  • Acari
  • Antarctic soil microarthropods and climate change
  • Arthropod
  • Climate change
  • Climate manipulation
  • Collembola
  • Diptera
  • Temperature variation, effect an arthropod numbers
  • Ultraviolet radiation
  • Water availability, effect on arthropod numbers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Convey, P., Pugh, P. J. A., Jackson, C., Murray, A. W., Ruhland, C. T., Xiong, F. S., & Day, T. (2002). Response of Antarctic terrestrial microarthropods to long-term climate manipulations. Ecology, 83(11), 3130-3140.

Response of Antarctic terrestrial microarthropods to long-term climate manipulations. / Convey, P.; Pugh, P. J A; Jackson, C.; Murray, A. W.; Ruhland, C. T.; Xiong, F. S.; Day, Thomas.

In: Ecology, Vol. 83, No. 11, 01.11.2002, p. 3130-3140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Convey, P, Pugh, PJA, Jackson, C, Murray, AW, Ruhland, CT, Xiong, FS & Day, T 2002, 'Response of Antarctic terrestrial microarthropods to long-term climate manipulations', Ecology, vol. 83, no. 11, pp. 3130-3140.
Convey P, Pugh PJA, Jackson C, Murray AW, Ruhland CT, Xiong FS et al. Response of Antarctic terrestrial microarthropods to long-term climate manipulations. Ecology. 2002 Nov 1;83(11):3130-3140.
Convey, P. ; Pugh, P. J A ; Jackson, C. ; Murray, A. W. ; Ruhland, C. T. ; Xiong, F. S. ; Day, Thomas. / Response of Antarctic terrestrial microarthropods to long-term climate manipulations. In: Ecology. 2002 ; Vol. 83, No. 11. pp. 3130-3140.
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