Resilience Training for Work-Related Stress among Health Care Workers

Erin G. Mistretta, Mary C. Davis, M'Hamed Temkit, Christopher Lorenz, Betty Darby, Cynthia M. Stonnington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether an in-person mindfulness-based resilience training (MBRT) program or a smartphone-delivered resiliency-based intervention improved stress, well-being, and burnout in employees at a major tertiary health care institution. Methods: Sixty participants were randomized to a 6-week MBRT, a resiliency-based smartphone intervention, or an active control group. Stress, well-being, and burnout were assessed at baseline, at program completion, and 3 months postintervention. Results: Both the MBRT and the smartphone groups showed improvements in well-being, whereas only the MBRT group showed improvements in stress and emotional burnout over time. The control group did not demonstrate sustained improvement on any outcome. Conclusion: Findings suggest that brief, targeted interventions improve psychological outcomes and point to the need for larger scale studies comparing the individual and combined treatments that can inform development of tailored, effective, and low-cost programs for health care workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-568
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Mindfulness
Delivery of Health Care
Control Groups
Tertiary Healthcare
Psychological Stress
Health Care Costs
Psychology
Education
Smartphone

Keywords

  • mindfulness
  • resilience
  • smartphone
  • work burnout
  • workplace intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Resilience Training for Work-Related Stress among Health Care Workers. / Mistretta, Erin G.; Davis, Mary C.; Temkit, M'Hamed; Lorenz, Christopher; Darby, Betty; Stonnington, Cynthia M.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 60, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 559-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mistretta, Erin G. ; Davis, Mary C. ; Temkit, M'Hamed ; Lorenz, Christopher ; Darby, Betty ; Stonnington, Cynthia M. / Resilience Training for Work-Related Stress among Health Care Workers. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 60, No. 6. pp. 559-568.
@article{ee0014ecf0c849f1b5656cba05da7ff0,
title = "Resilience Training for Work-Related Stress among Health Care Workers",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether an in-person mindfulness-based resilience training (MBRT) program or a smartphone-delivered resiliency-based intervention improved stress, well-being, and burnout in employees at a major tertiary health care institution. Methods: Sixty participants were randomized to a 6-week MBRT, a resiliency-based smartphone intervention, or an active control group. Stress, well-being, and burnout were assessed at baseline, at program completion, and 3 months postintervention. Results: Both the MBRT and the smartphone groups showed improvements in well-being, whereas only the MBRT group showed improvements in stress and emotional burnout over time. The control group did not demonstrate sustained improvement on any outcome. Conclusion: Findings suggest that brief, targeted interventions improve psychological outcomes and point to the need for larger scale studies comparing the individual and combined treatments that can inform development of tailored, effective, and low-cost programs for health care workers.",
keywords = "mindfulness, resilience, smartphone, work burnout, workplace intervention",
author = "Mistretta, {Erin G.} and Davis, {Mary C.} and M'Hamed Temkit and Christopher Lorenz and Betty Darby and Stonnington, {Cynthia M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/JOM.0000000000001285",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "559--568",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resilience Training for Work-Related Stress among Health Care Workers

AU - Mistretta, Erin G.

AU - Davis, Mary C.

AU - Temkit, M'Hamed

AU - Lorenz, Christopher

AU - Darby, Betty

AU - Stonnington, Cynthia M.

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether an in-person mindfulness-based resilience training (MBRT) program or a smartphone-delivered resiliency-based intervention improved stress, well-being, and burnout in employees at a major tertiary health care institution. Methods: Sixty participants were randomized to a 6-week MBRT, a resiliency-based smartphone intervention, or an active control group. Stress, well-being, and burnout were assessed at baseline, at program completion, and 3 months postintervention. Results: Both the MBRT and the smartphone groups showed improvements in well-being, whereas only the MBRT group showed improvements in stress and emotional burnout over time. The control group did not demonstrate sustained improvement on any outcome. Conclusion: Findings suggest that brief, targeted interventions improve psychological outcomes and point to the need for larger scale studies comparing the individual and combined treatments that can inform development of tailored, effective, and low-cost programs for health care workers.

AB - Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether an in-person mindfulness-based resilience training (MBRT) program or a smartphone-delivered resiliency-based intervention improved stress, well-being, and burnout in employees at a major tertiary health care institution. Methods: Sixty participants were randomized to a 6-week MBRT, a resiliency-based smartphone intervention, or an active control group. Stress, well-being, and burnout were assessed at baseline, at program completion, and 3 months postintervention. Results: Both the MBRT and the smartphone groups showed improvements in well-being, whereas only the MBRT group showed improvements in stress and emotional burnout over time. The control group did not demonstrate sustained improvement on any outcome. Conclusion: Findings suggest that brief, targeted interventions improve psychological outcomes and point to the need for larger scale studies comparing the individual and combined treatments that can inform development of tailored, effective, and low-cost programs for health care workers.

KW - mindfulness

KW - resilience

KW - smartphone

KW - work burnout

KW - workplace intervention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048146382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048146382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001285

DO - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001285

M3 - Article

C2 - 29370014

AN - SCOPUS:85048146382

VL - 60

SP - 559

EP - 568

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 6

ER -