Researching experiences of African refugee youth in high-income countries: Reflections on conceptual challenges and possibilities

Meseret F. Hailu, Tebeje Molla, A. T. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

African refugee youth and young adults live at the intersections of many structural barriers, including xenophobia, racism, and misogyny. In this conceptual paper, we present considerations for education scholars who seek to conduct research with and about African refugee postsecondary students. We start with a discussion of the discourse of Othering and racial stigma against Black-African people in high income countries. Next, we discuss the need for intersectional analysis in research by focusing on how gendered racism positions African women refugees as particularly vulnerable in higher education institutions. Then, we proceed to a discussion of how cultural heritage presents us with a counternarrative to xenophobic discourse. At each point, we present a set of critical questions that serve as a conceptual springboard for researchers that are exploring more deeply the issues that affect refugee youth and their education. Through this work, we implore researchers to engage with/in these communities in ways that are resistant to Othering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Intercultural Relations
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African students
  • Cultural heritage
  • Higher education
  • Intersectionality
  • Othering
  • Refugees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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