Research in secondary english, 1912-2011: Historical continuities and discontinuities in the NCTE imprint

Jory Brass, Leslie David Burns

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study identified historical continuities and discontinuities across a century of secondary research published in English Journal (1912-1966) and Research in the Teaching of English (1967-2011). It highlights considerable methodological continuity across six decades of English Journal and some shifts in research emphases that tended to echo changing emphases in psychological research, curriculum reforms, and critiques of traditional linguistics. The analysis of secondary research published in Research in the Teaching of English explores how RTE emerged in 1967 with a definition of empirical social science that both expanded and contracted practices of positivist research and also excluded traditions of practitioner research and humanities-based research that had been published for decades in EJ. Next, the study tracks patterns of continuity and change across RTE from the late 1960s to the present, including shifts in secondary research that seemed to echo shifts in behavioral science (1960s-1980s), cognitive psychology (1980s), and the onset of "sociocultural" research (early 1990s to present). The article concludes with a brief discussion of overarching impressions of continuity and change in secondary research, the place of "science" within the NCTE imprint, and a call for more historical research in English education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-186
Number of pages16
JournalResearch in the Teaching of English
Volume46
Issue number2
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

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