Research collaboration in the discovery, development, and delivery networks of a statewide cancer coalition

Keith G. Provan, Scott Leischow, Judith Keagy, Jesse Nodora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines and evaluates collaborative network involvement among 18 organizations within the Arizona Cancer Coalition. All were involved in one or more of three types of research activity: discovery, development, and delivery, consistent with the 3D continuum developed by the National Cancer Institute. Data were collected in 2007 using surveys of key informants in each organization. Using network analysis methods, we examined the structure of each type of network as well as the relationship between network position and the importance of cancer research to each organization's mission. Findings indicated that while both the discovery and delivery networks were comparably densely connected, their centrality structures were quite different. In contrast, the structures of both these networks were similar to the development network. Centrality in the discovery and development networks was positively related to the importance of cancer research to the organization, but not in the delivery network. Implications of the findings for future research, policy, and planning are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-355
Number of pages7
JournalEvaluation and Program Planning
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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coalition
cancer
Organizations
Research
Neoplasms
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
network analysis
organization
Research collaboration
Cancer
planning
Network development
Centrality

Keywords

  • Health
  • Network analysis
  • Organizational networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Business and International Management
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Strategy and Management
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Research collaboration in the discovery, development, and delivery networks of a statewide cancer coalition. / Provan, Keith G.; Leischow, Scott; Keagy, Judith; Nodora, Jesse.

In: Evaluation and Program Planning, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.11.2010, p. 349-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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