Reproductive Coercion by an Intimate Partner: Occurrence, Associations, and Interference with Sexual Health Decision Making

Jonel Thaller, Jill Messing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Reproductive coercion is a form of intimate partner violence (IPV) in which a variety of tactics can be used to force pregnancy on an intimate partner. This study investigated the occurrence of male-perpetrated reproductive coercion, its relationship to other forms of IPV, and interference with women's sexual health decision making. Two data sets were collected, by conducting client-practitioner screenings (n = 2,108) and anonymous surveys (n = 84), from women seeking reproductive health services in a southwestern state and analyzed separately. Prevalence and correlates of reproductive coercion varied according to data-collection method, indicating that behaviorally based screening tools and anonymous screening may increase disclosure rates. In the screening sample, reproductive coercion was associated with forced sex, threats of physical harm, and verbal abuse. In the survey sample, reproductive coercion was associated with being nonwhite, fear of asking one's partner to use a condom, and fear of refusing sex. Social workers should be aware that reproductive coercion is a form of coercive control that may be associated with increased fear and IPV and may interfere with sexual health decision making; however, disclosure of reproductive coercion or IPV is not necessary for intervention. The article concludes with a discussion of screening and intervention strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e11-e19
JournalHealth and Social Work
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 24 2014

Keywords

  • domestic violence
  • family planning
  • intimate partner violence
  • reproductive health
  • screenings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reproductive Coercion by an Intimate Partner: Occurrence, Associations, and Interference with Sexual Health Decision Making'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this