Reply: The oldest marine carbonate ooids reinterpreted as volcanic accretionary lapilli, Onverwacht Group, South Africa.

D. R. Lowe, L. P. Knauth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In replying to Self and Sparks' discussion of their 1978 paper (see previous abstract), the authors consider that meaningful comparison of recent and ancient accretionary lapilli abundances is best based on the ratio of volume of accretionary lapilli to total volume of pyroclastic debris but that the preservation potential must also be considered. They report new field evidence which shows that accretionary lapilli occur in the Onverwacht Group at almost every horizon representing a favourable low-energy, subaerial to shallow water depositional environment and containing fine-grained air-fall pyroclastic detritus. In contrast to Phanerozoic sequences the environment of deposition not the rate of production apparently controlled accretionary lapilli abundance. They believe that this new evidence reinforces their original suggestions. -after Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-666
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Sedimentary Petrology
Volume49
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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