Replication of CNTNAP2 association with nonword repetition and support for FOXP2 association with timed reading and motor activities in a dyslexia family sample

Beate Peter, Wendy H. Raskind, Mark Matsushita, Mark Lisowski, Tiffany Vu, Virginia W. Berninger, Ellen M. Wijsman, Zoran Brkanac

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two functionally related genes, FOXP2 and CNTNAP2, influence language abilities in families with rare syndromic and common nonsyndromic forms of impaired language, respectively. We investigated whether these genes are associated with component phenotypes of dyslexia and measures of sequential motor ability. Quantitative transmission disequilibrium testing (QTDT) and linear association modeling were used to evaluate associations with measures of phonological memory (nonword repetition, NWR), expressive language (sentence repetition), reading (real word reading efficiency, RWRE; word attack, WATT), and timed sequential motor activities (rapid alternating place of articulation, RAPA; finger succession in the dominant hand, FS-D) in 188 family trios with a child with dyslexia. Consistent with a prior study of language impairment, QTDT in dyslexia showed evidence of CNTNAP2 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association with NWR. For FOXP2, we provide the first evidence for SNP association with component phenotypes of dyslexia, specifically NWR and RWRE but not WATT. In addition, FOXP2 SNP associations with both RAPA and FS-D were observed. Our results confirm the role of CNTNAP2 in NWR in a dyslexia sample and motivate new questions about the effects of FOXP2 in neurodevelopmental disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-49
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Linear modeling
  • Modality-specific motor sequencing
  • Quantitative transmission disequilibrium
  • Spoken language
  • Written language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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