Abstract

As arsenic treatment systems for groundwater are being designed and installed, it is becoming apparent that many co-occurring anions can be present along with arsenic. Geological formations containing arsenic are often enriched with other trace metals, including uranium, antimony, tungsten, vanadium, and silica. With exception of silica, U, Sb, W, and V have all been implicated with various adverse human health effects. New regulations mean that many small utilities still do not know how much uranium is present in their waters. While silica does not pose a health effect, its presence detrimentally impacts arsenic removal by iron adsorbents. Elevated phosphate is less likely to occur in conjunction with elevated arsenic, but we have data from several sites with significant P concentrations. There is also the potential for chemical contaminants (e.g., perchlorate) to occur with arsenic - and systems designed to remove ClO4 - generally do not remove arsenic. Therefore data from multiple groundwaters across the US were studied for simultaneous removal of arsenic and co-occurring anions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights
Pages3032-3058
Number of pages27
StatePublished - 2006
EventWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Nov 5 2006Nov 9 2006

Other

OtherWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period11/5/0611/9/06

Fingerprint

Arsenic
Polysilicon
anion
arsenic
Negative ions
know how
health
regulation
water
silica
Silica
Uranium
Groundwater
uranium
Health
groundwater
perchlorate
removal
antimony
Antimony

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Westerhoff, P., Hristovski, K., Benn, T., & Shafieian, P. (2006). Removal of co-occurring anions (U, Sb, W, V, P, Si, CIO4) during arsenic treatment. In American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights (pp. 3032-3058)

Removal of co-occurring anions (U, Sb, W, V, P, Si, CIO4) during arsenic treatment. / Westerhoff, Paul; Hristovski, Kiril; Benn, Troy; Shafieian, Pedram.

American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights. 2006. p. 3032-3058.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Westerhoff, P, Hristovski, K, Benn, T & Shafieian, P 2006, Removal of co-occurring anions (U, Sb, W, V, P, Si, CIO4) during arsenic treatment. in American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights. pp. 3032-3058, Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights, Denver, CO, United States, 11/5/06.
Westerhoff P, Hristovski K, Benn T, Shafieian P. Removal of co-occurring anions (U, Sb, W, V, P, Si, CIO4) during arsenic treatment. In American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights. 2006. p. 3032-3058
Westerhoff, Paul ; Hristovski, Kiril ; Benn, Troy ; Shafieian, Pedram. / Removal of co-occurring anions (U, Sb, W, V, P, Si, CIO4) during arsenic treatment. American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2006: Taking Water Quality to New Heights. 2006. pp. 3032-3058
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abstract = "As arsenic treatment systems for groundwater are being designed and installed, it is becoming apparent that many co-occurring anions can be present along with arsenic. Geological formations containing arsenic are often enriched with other trace metals, including uranium, antimony, tungsten, vanadium, and silica. With exception of silica, U, Sb, W, and V have all been implicated with various adverse human health effects. New regulations mean that many small utilities still do not know how much uranium is present in their waters. While silica does not pose a health effect, its presence detrimentally impacts arsenic removal by iron adsorbents. Elevated phosphate is less likely to occur in conjunction with elevated arsenic, but we have data from several sites with significant P concentrations. There is also the potential for chemical contaminants (e.g., perchlorate) to occur with arsenic - and systems designed to remove ClO4 - generally do not remove arsenic. Therefore data from multiple groundwaters across the US were studied for simultaneous removal of arsenic and co-occurring anions.",
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