Remote sensing of the surface urban heat island and land architecture in Phoenix, Arizona

Combined effects of land composition and configuration and cadastral-demographic-economic factors

Xiaoxiao Li, WenWen Li, A. Middel, Sharon Harlan, A. J. Brazel, Billie Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study seeks to determine the role of land architecture-the composition and configuration of land cover-as well as cadastral-demographic-economic factors on land surface temperature (LST) and the surface urban heat island effect of Phoenix, Arizona. It employs 1 m National Agricultural Imagery Program data of land-cover with 120 m Landsat-derived land surface temperature, decomposed to 30. m, a new measure of configuration, the normalized moment of inertia, and U.S. Census data to address the question for two randomly selected samples comprising 523 and 545 residential neighborhoods (census blocks) in the city. The results indicate that, contrary to most other studies, land configuration has a stronger influence on LST than land composition. In addition, both land configuration and architecture combined with cadastral, demographic, and economic variables, capture a significant amount of explained variance in LST. The results indicate that attention to land architecture in the development of or reshaping of neighborhoods may ameliorate the summer extremes in LST.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-243
Number of pages11
JournalRemote Sensing of Environment
Volume174
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

economic factors
heat island
remote sensing
land surface
Remote sensing
surface temperature
demographic statistics
Economics
Chemical analysis
economics
census
land cover
Temperature
inertia
Landsat
imagery
Thermal effects
effect
land
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Land architecture
  • Land cover
  • Land surface temperature
  • Spatial pattern
  • Surface urban heat island

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Soil Science
  • Geology

Cite this

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title = "Remote sensing of the surface urban heat island and land architecture in Phoenix, Arizona: Combined effects of land composition and configuration and cadastral-demographic-economic factors",
abstract = "This study seeks to determine the role of land architecture-the composition and configuration of land cover-as well as cadastral-demographic-economic factors on land surface temperature (LST) and the surface urban heat island effect of Phoenix, Arizona. It employs 1 m National Agricultural Imagery Program data of land-cover with 120 m Landsat-derived land surface temperature, decomposed to 30. m, a new measure of configuration, the normalized moment of inertia, and U.S. Census data to address the question for two randomly selected samples comprising 523 and 545 residential neighborhoods (census blocks) in the city. The results indicate that, contrary to most other studies, land configuration has a stronger influence on LST than land composition. In addition, both land configuration and architecture combined with cadastral, demographic, and economic variables, capture a significant amount of explained variance in LST. The results indicate that attention to land architecture in the development of or reshaping of neighborhoods may ameliorate the summer extremes in LST.",
keywords = "Land architecture, Land cover, Land surface temperature, Spatial pattern, Surface urban heat island",
author = "Xiaoxiao Li and WenWen Li and A. Middel and Sharon Harlan and Brazel, {A. J.} and Billie Turner",
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AU - Li, WenWen

AU - Middel, A.

AU - Harlan, Sharon

AU - Brazel, A. J.

AU - Turner, Billie

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - This study seeks to determine the role of land architecture-the composition and configuration of land cover-as well as cadastral-demographic-economic factors on land surface temperature (LST) and the surface urban heat island effect of Phoenix, Arizona. It employs 1 m National Agricultural Imagery Program data of land-cover with 120 m Landsat-derived land surface temperature, decomposed to 30. m, a new measure of configuration, the normalized moment of inertia, and U.S. Census data to address the question for two randomly selected samples comprising 523 and 545 residential neighborhoods (census blocks) in the city. The results indicate that, contrary to most other studies, land configuration has a stronger influence on LST than land composition. In addition, both land configuration and architecture combined with cadastral, demographic, and economic variables, capture a significant amount of explained variance in LST. The results indicate that attention to land architecture in the development of or reshaping of neighborhoods may ameliorate the summer extremes in LST.

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