REMAP—a Resilience Resources Measure for Prediction and Management of Somatic Symptoms

William B. Malarkey, Prabu David, Jean Philippe Gouin, Michael Edwards, Maryanna Klatt, Alex J. Zautra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Patients with symptoms but without an identified disease are a challenge to primary care providers. A 22-item measure is introduced and evaluated to offer medical care providers with an instrument to assess and discuss possible deficiencies in resilience resources that may contribute to symptoms without identifiable pathology. This instrument highlights psychosocial and lifestyle resources that serve as buffers to life’s stressors rather than focusing on stress and its related symptoms. Methods: The measure included items from five resilience domains—relational engagement, emotional sensibility, meaningful action, awareness of self and others, and physical health behaviors (REMAP). Its structure and function were evaluated using two different samples. Results: Results suggest that scores from the REMAP have reasonable psychometric properties. Higher REMAP scores were predictive of fewer health symptoms in a sample representative of the US population. In a second sample, REMAP was positively associated with perceived resilience, ego strength and mindfulness attention and negatively related to perceived stress, depression, sleep disturbances, and loneliness, providing evidence of convergent and divergent validity. Furthermore, the REMAP scale was sensitive to change following a life style intervention. Conclusion: This suggests that REMAP can be a useful tool in practice settings for counseling patients with unexplained symptoms. With insight into the biopsychosocial aspect of their symptoms, patients may become more receptive to cognitive behavioral options to improve their resilience resources and lifestyle choices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 11 2016

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Life Style
Ego
Mindfulness
Loneliness
Health Behavior
Psychometrics
Counseling
Primary Health Care
Buffers
Sleep
Depression
Pathology
Health
Population
Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Keywords

  • Biopsychosocial medicine
  • Resilience
  • Somatic symptoms
  • Symptom management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

REMAP—a Resilience Resources Measure for Prediction and Management of Somatic Symptoms. / Malarkey, William B.; David, Prabu; Gouin, Jean Philippe; Edwards, Michael; Klatt, Maryanna; Zautra, Alex J.

In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 11.04.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malarkey, William B. ; David, Prabu ; Gouin, Jean Philippe ; Edwards, Michael ; Klatt, Maryanna ; Zautra, Alex J. / REMAP—a Resilience Resources Measure for Prediction and Management of Somatic Symptoms. In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2016 ; pp. 1-8.
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