Religious obsessions and compulsions in a non-clinical sample: The Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS)

Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Jonathan D. Huppert, Adam B. Cohen, David F. Tolin, Shawn P. Cahill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

126 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present investigation reports on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS), a 19-item self-report scale measuring religious obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Factor analysis yielded a two factor solution with the first subscale measuring fears about having committed sin, and the second measuring fears concerning punishment from God. Using a sample of college students, the PIOS was shown to be internally consistent and possess good convergent and discriminant validity. Highly devout participants evidenced higher scores on both PIOS subscales, but devout Jews evidenced fewer fears of sin and punishment from God compared to devout Protestants or Catholics. The PIOS has utility both as a research and clinical tool.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)825-838
Number of pages14
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Factor analysis
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Religion
  • Scrupulosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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