Religious discrimination and ethical compliance: Exploring perceptions among a professionally affiliated sample of graduate students

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

In keeping with the profession's long history of addressing discrimination, this study explores perceptions of religious discrimination and ethical compliance among a national sample of professionally affiliated graduate students (N = 111). Relevant theory and research is reviewed, which provides a context for the study's exploration of (1) the degree to which respondents personally experience discrimination in their social work programs due to their religious beliefs (2) the extent to which respondents perceive religious discrimination is a problem in their educational programs and (3) respondents' perceptions of the profession's level of compliance with the six ethical standards that explicitly or implicitly address religion. The findings are presented and the implications are discussed as they intersect the social work profession and education in particular.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-113
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 13 2007

Keywords

  • Code of ethics
  • Discrimination
  • Human diversity
  • Religion
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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