Religion, religiosity and spirituality in the biopsychosocial model of health and ageing

Adam Cohen, Harold G. Koenig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Religiosity/spirituality and the tendency to use these in coping are common in older adults. We review evidence that these are positively associated with mental and physical health in older adults, as well as evidence that members of different religious groups differ in levels of health. Studies on mental health include those that examine well-being and depression. Physical health outcomes include mortality, cancer, stroke, and physical functioning. We discuss the issue of causality and possible mediators of effects of religiosity/ spirituality on health outcomes, paying special attention to possible psychological mediators. Last, we discuss possible differences in these associations between members of various cultural and religious groups, and caution that there may be theological problems with the use of religion to promoting health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-241
Number of pages27
JournalAgeing International
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Fingerprint

Spirituality
Religion
spirituality
Mental Health
Health
health
religious group
Causality
Health Status
Stroke
Depression
Psychology
stroke
causality
Mortality
evidence
coping
cancer
mortality
well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Religion, religiosity and spirituality in the biopsychosocial model of health and ageing. / Cohen, Adam; Koenig, Harold G.

In: Ageing International, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.01.2003, p. 215-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e44687c7b311409c9ff6fc4fc134b4d1,
title = "Religion, religiosity and spirituality in the biopsychosocial model of health and ageing",
abstract = "Religiosity/spirituality and the tendency to use these in coping are common in older adults. We review evidence that these are positively associated with mental and physical health in older adults, as well as evidence that members of different religious groups differ in levels of health. Studies on mental health include those that examine well-being and depression. Physical health outcomes include mortality, cancer, stroke, and physical functioning. We discuss the issue of causality and possible mediators of effects of religiosity/ spirituality on health outcomes, paying special attention to possible psychological mediators. Last, we discuss possible differences in these associations between members of various cultural and religious groups, and caution that there may be theological problems with the use of religion to promoting health.",
author = "Adam Cohen and Koenig, {Harold G.}",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s12126-002-1005-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "215--241",
journal = "Ageing International",
issn = "0163-5158",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Religion, religiosity and spirituality in the biopsychosocial model of health and ageing

AU - Cohen, Adam

AU - Koenig, Harold G.

PY - 2003/1/1

Y1 - 2003/1/1

N2 - Religiosity/spirituality and the tendency to use these in coping are common in older adults. We review evidence that these are positively associated with mental and physical health in older adults, as well as evidence that members of different religious groups differ in levels of health. Studies on mental health include those that examine well-being and depression. Physical health outcomes include mortality, cancer, stroke, and physical functioning. We discuss the issue of causality and possible mediators of effects of religiosity/ spirituality on health outcomes, paying special attention to possible psychological mediators. Last, we discuss possible differences in these associations between members of various cultural and religious groups, and caution that there may be theological problems with the use of religion to promoting health.

AB - Religiosity/spirituality and the tendency to use these in coping are common in older adults. We review evidence that these are positively associated with mental and physical health in older adults, as well as evidence that members of different religious groups differ in levels of health. Studies on mental health include those that examine well-being and depression. Physical health outcomes include mortality, cancer, stroke, and physical functioning. We discuss the issue of causality and possible mediators of effects of religiosity/ spirituality on health outcomes, paying special attention to possible psychological mediators. Last, we discuss possible differences in these associations between members of various cultural and religious groups, and caution that there may be theological problems with the use of religion to promoting health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58149491356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58149491356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12126-002-1005-1

DO - 10.1007/s12126-002-1005-1

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 215

EP - 241

JO - Ageing International

JF - Ageing International

SN - 0163-5158

IS - 3

ER -