Religion, Ecology, and Gender

A Jewish Perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the reasons for the limited interest in environmentalism in Judaism. The author suggests that the reasons are both historical and theological, Jews have been an urban people since the tenth century and they are also people of the book—that is a culture that sees any distraction from scholarly contemplation as less than worthy. However, over the past three decades there has been an interest and this is in response to the claim that the Judeo-Christian tradition is to blame for the environmental crisis. The author challenges the notion that nature can be seen as the base of a core ethic of care pointing out that it is violent and does not care for the weak. The article challenges earth-based spirituality as it has appropriated the kabbalah, particularly the Skehinah and suggests that a misreading underpins this approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-397
Number of pages25
JournalFeminist Theology
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

ecology
Religion
Judaism
gender
spirituality
Jew
moral philosophy
Distraction
Ethics of Care
Judeo-Christian
Environmental Crisis
Jews
Nature
Contemplation
Environmentalism
Kabbalah
Spirituality
Christian Tradition
Ecology
Misreading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Religion, Ecology, and Gender : A Jewish Perspective. / Samuelson, Hava.

In: Feminist Theology, Vol. 13, No. 3, 2005, p. 373-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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