Relationships among health beliefs, self-efficacy, and exercise adherence in patients with coronary artery disease

D. Robertson, C. Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Management of the pathologic progression of coronary artery disease requires life-style changes in patients, but the level of compliance with medical recommendations is low. Critical care nurses have a unique opportunity to encourage patients to assume responsibility for their health care and life-style behavior. In this study we developed a model to identify the relationships among variables that explained adherence to a recommended exercise regimen. The variables studied included self-efficacy, perceived severity, barriers, benefits, and cues to action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-63
Number of pages8
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Critical Care
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Self Efficacy
Patient Compliance
Life Style
Coronary Artery Disease
Exercise
Health
Critical Care
Cues
Nurses
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Relationships among health beliefs, self-efficacy, and exercise adherence in patients with coronary artery disease. / Robertson, D.; Keller, C.

In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Critical Care, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.1992, p. 56-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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