Relationship status and quality moderate daily pain-related changes in physical disability, affect, and cognitions in women with chronic pain

Shannon Stark Taylor, Mary Davis, Alex J. Zautra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to examine whether (1) daily pain-related changes in physical functioning differed between happily partnered, unhappily partnered, and unpartnered female chronic pain patients, and (2) affect and pain cognitions mediated the partner status effect on pain-related changes in physical functioning. Two hundred fifty-one women with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis and/or fibromyalgia completed 30 daily electronic diaries assessing pain, affect, pain-related cognitions, and physical functioning. Patients living with a romantic partner also completed a modified version of the Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Scale to assess relationship satisfaction. Multilevel modeling revealed that patients in satisfying unions showed more adaptive daily pain-related changes in physical functioning, pain coping difficulty, and catastrophizing compared to those in unsatisfying unions and those who were unpartnered. Both partnered groups also showed more adaptive pain-related changes in positive affect compared to the unpartnered group. The impact of relationship status on pain-related changes in physical functioning was partly mediated by the pain cognitions catastrophizing and coping difficulty. These results indicate that happily partnered pain patients show less pain-related physical disability and more adaptive affective and cognitive responses to daily pain changes than do unhappily partnered and unpartnered patients. Living in a happy union may bolster the capacity of patients to sustain a sense of pain coping efficacy during pain episodes, which in turn, minimizes pain-related physical activity limitations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-153
Number of pages7
JournalPain
Volume154
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Chronic Pain
Cognition
Pain
Catastrophization
Social Adjustment
Fibromyalgia
Osteoarthritis

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Daily process methodology
  • Pain coping
  • Spousal relations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Relationship status and quality moderate daily pain-related changes in physical disability, affect, and cognitions in women with chronic pain. / Taylor, Shannon Stark; Davis, Mary; Zautra, Alex J.

In: Pain, Vol. 154, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 147-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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