Relationship of self-beliefs, social support, and university comfort with the academic success of freshman college women

Andrea Dixon Rayle, Sharon Kurpius, Patricia Arredondo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationships of self-beliefs, social support, and university comfort with the academic persistence decisions and first-year grade point averages of 527 first semester female undergraduates were examined. Data were gathered in 56 classes or group meetings. These three constructs predicted academic persistence decisions, with social support as the strongest predictor, followed by self-beliefs, and then university comfort. Although there were no differences between Euro-American women and women of color on initial academic persistence decisions, Euro-American women had higher first-year GPAs than did the women of color. Research-informed practice and policy implications for increasing the persistence decisions and academic success of first-year female college students are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-343
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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academic success
persistence
social support
university
research policy
research practice
semester
Group
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

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