Relationship between depression and pancreatic cancer in the general population

Caroline P. Carney, Laura Jones, Robert F. Woolson, Russell Noyes, Bradley Doebbeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Prior research suggesting a relationship between pancreatic cancer and depression conducted on clinical populations has been subject to recall bias. We reexamined this association using longitudinal population-based data. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study using longitudinal insurance claims data. Results: Men with mental disorders were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than those without psychiatric claims (odds ratio 2.4, confidence interval 1.15-4.78). Depression more commonly preceded pancreatic cancer than it did other gastrointestinal malignancies (odds ratio 4.6, confidence interval 1.07-19.4) or all other cancers (odds ratio 4.1, confidence interval 1.05-16.0). Conclusions: Depression and pancreatic cancer are associated in the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)884-888
Number of pages5
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume65
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pancreatic Neoplasms
Depression
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population
Insurance
Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Research

Keywords

  • Claims
  • Depression
  • Epidemiology
  • Insurance
  • Mental disorders
  • Pancreatic cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Relationship between depression and pancreatic cancer in the general population. / Carney, Caroline P.; Jones, Laura; Woolson, Robert F.; Noyes, Russell; Doebbeling, Bradley.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 65, No. 5, 09.2003, p. 884-888.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carney, Caroline P. ; Jones, Laura ; Woolson, Robert F. ; Noyes, Russell ; Doebbeling, Bradley. / Relationship between depression and pancreatic cancer in the general population. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 884-888.
@article{d78cb1654495434e99e21d722d720ed6,
title = "Relationship between depression and pancreatic cancer in the general population",
abstract = "Objective: Prior research suggesting a relationship between pancreatic cancer and depression conducted on clinical populations has been subject to recall bias. We reexamined this association using longitudinal population-based data. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study using longitudinal insurance claims data. Results: Men with mental disorders were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than those without psychiatric claims (odds ratio 2.4, confidence interval 1.15-4.78). Depression more commonly preceded pancreatic cancer than it did other gastrointestinal malignancies (odds ratio 4.6, confidence interval 1.07-19.4) or all other cancers (odds ratio 4.1, confidence interval 1.05-16.0). Conclusions: Depression and pancreatic cancer are associated in the general population.",
keywords = "Claims, Depression, Epidemiology, Insurance, Mental disorders, Pancreatic cancer",
author = "Carney, {Caroline P.} and Laura Jones and Woolson, {Robert F.} and Russell Noyes and Bradley Doebbeling",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1097/01.PSY.0000088588.23348.D5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "884--888",
journal = "Psychosomatic Medicine",
issn = "0033-3174",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between depression and pancreatic cancer in the general population

AU - Carney, Caroline P.

AU - Jones, Laura

AU - Woolson, Robert F.

AU - Noyes, Russell

AU - Doebbeling, Bradley

PY - 2003/9

Y1 - 2003/9

N2 - Objective: Prior research suggesting a relationship between pancreatic cancer and depression conducted on clinical populations has been subject to recall bias. We reexamined this association using longitudinal population-based data. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study using longitudinal insurance claims data. Results: Men with mental disorders were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than those without psychiatric claims (odds ratio 2.4, confidence interval 1.15-4.78). Depression more commonly preceded pancreatic cancer than it did other gastrointestinal malignancies (odds ratio 4.6, confidence interval 1.07-19.4) or all other cancers (odds ratio 4.1, confidence interval 1.05-16.0). Conclusions: Depression and pancreatic cancer are associated in the general population.

AB - Objective: Prior research suggesting a relationship between pancreatic cancer and depression conducted on clinical populations has been subject to recall bias. We reexamined this association using longitudinal population-based data. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study using longitudinal insurance claims data. Results: Men with mental disorders were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than those without psychiatric claims (odds ratio 2.4, confidence interval 1.15-4.78). Depression more commonly preceded pancreatic cancer than it did other gastrointestinal malignancies (odds ratio 4.6, confidence interval 1.07-19.4) or all other cancers (odds ratio 4.1, confidence interval 1.05-16.0). Conclusions: Depression and pancreatic cancer are associated in the general population.

KW - Claims

KW - Depression

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Insurance

KW - Mental disorders

KW - Pancreatic cancer

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0141857811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0141857811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.PSY.0000088588.23348.D5

DO - 10.1097/01.PSY.0000088588.23348.D5

M3 - Article

C2 - 14508036

AN - SCOPUS:0141857811

VL - 65

SP - 884

EP - 888

JO - Psychosomatic Medicine

JF - Psychosomatic Medicine

SN - 0033-3174

IS - 5

ER -