Relationship between age-related gait adaptations and required coefficient of friction

Sukwon Kim, Thurmon Lockhart, Hoon Yong Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate if age-related gait adaptations in walking velocity, step length and heel contact velocity could adversely influence friction demand characteristics (i.e. RCOF) and the likelihood of slip initiation. Additionally, relationship between transitional acceleration of the whole body center-of-mass (COM) and friction demand was assessed between young and older participants. Fourteen younger (7 females and 7 males, 18-30 years old) and 14 older (7 females and 7 males, over 65 years old) adults participated in the study. While wearing a safety harness, all participants walked at their preferred gait speed for approximately 20 min on the linear walking track, and synchronized ground reaction forces and posture data were captured using the force plates and six infrared cameras, respectively. The results indicated that older adults walked slower with slower heel contact velocity, and produced lower friction demand (i.e. RCOF) in comparison to younger adults. However, ANCOVA indicated that the differences in heel contact velocity between the two age groups were due to effects of walking velocity. The multiple regression and bivariate regression analyses suggested that, for older adults, heel contact velocity was a predictor for the RCOF, whereas, for younger adults, walking velocity, step length and transitional acceleration of the whole body COM were the factors contributing to the RCOF. In conclusion, the present study suggested that gait adaptations among the elderly must be considered when predicting the likelihood of slip initiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-436
Number of pages12
JournalSafety Science
Volume43
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heel
Friction
Gait
Walking
contact
young adult
Young Adult
demand
regression
Posture
age group
Age Groups
Regression Analysis
Safety
Cameras
Infrared radiation

Keywords

  • Age
  • Friction demand
  • Gait
  • Slip initiation
  • Walking velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Health and Safety
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Safety Research

Cite this

Relationship between age-related gait adaptations and required coefficient of friction. / Kim, Sukwon; Lockhart, Thurmon; Yoon, Hoon Yong.

In: Safety Science, Vol. 43, No. 7, 08.2005, p. 425-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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