Relations of student perceptions of teacher oral feedback with teacher expectancies and student self-concept

Yi Hsin Chen, Marilyn Thompson, Jeffrey D. Kromrey, George H. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this article, the authors investigated the relations of students' perceptions of teachers' oral feedback with teacher expectancies and student self-concept. A sample of 1,598 Taiwanese children in Grades 3 to 6 completed measures of student perceptions of teacher oral feedback and school self-concept. Homeroom teachers identified students for whom they had high or low expectancies. Discriminant analysis indicated student perceptions of positive and negative academic oral feedback were more important than nonacademic feedback in predicting teacher expectancies. A 2-way multivariate analysis of variance showed that boys perceived more negative oral feedback than did girls, and fifth-grade students perceived more negative oral feedback on academic and nonacademic domains than did the third-and fourth-grade students. Furthermore, structural equation modeling results indicated a particularly strong relation between positive academic oral feedback and academic self-concept.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-477
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Experimental Education
Volume79
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 24 2011

Keywords

  • classroom research
  • student perception
  • student self-concept
  • teacher expectancy
  • teacher oral feedback

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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