Relations from temperamental approach reactivity and effortful control to academic achievement and peer relations in early elementary school

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of the current study was to examine relations from temperamental approach reactivity (i.e., impulsivity, frustration, and positive affect) and effortful control (EC; 42 and 54. months) to teachers' reports of academic achievement and popularity (72 and 84. months). Frustration was positively related to achievement and negatively related to popularity for girls, but unrelated to boys' outcomes. Interactions suggested that, among children with high EC or emotional approach (frustration or positive emotion), impulsivity positively predicted achievement. Few gender differences in interactions were noted. These results provide insight into the dynamics relations from temperament/personality to children's academic and social adjustment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 10 2015

Fingerprint

Frustration
Impulsive Behavior
Social Adjustment
Temperament
Personality
Emotions

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Peer relations
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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title = "Relations from temperamental approach reactivity and effortful control to academic achievement and peer relations in early elementary school",
abstract = "The goal of the current study was to examine relations from temperamental approach reactivity (i.e., impulsivity, frustration, and positive affect) and effortful control (EC; 42 and 54. months) to teachers' reports of academic achievement and popularity (72 and 84. months). Frustration was positively related to achievement and negatively related to popularity for girls, but unrelated to boys' outcomes. Interactions suggested that, among children with high EC or emotional approach (frustration or positive emotion), impulsivity positively predicted achievement. Few gender differences in interactions were noted. These results provide insight into the dynamics relations from temperament/personality to children's academic and social adjustment.",
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AU - Eisenberg, Nancy

AU - Valiente, Carlos

AU - Spinrad, Tracy

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N2 - The goal of the current study was to examine relations from temperamental approach reactivity (i.e., impulsivity, frustration, and positive affect) and effortful control (EC; 42 and 54. months) to teachers' reports of academic achievement and popularity (72 and 84. months). Frustration was positively related to achievement and negatively related to popularity for girls, but unrelated to boys' outcomes. Interactions suggested that, among children with high EC or emotional approach (frustration or positive emotion), impulsivity positively predicted achievement. Few gender differences in interactions were noted. These results provide insight into the dynamics relations from temperament/personality to children's academic and social adjustment.

AB - The goal of the current study was to examine relations from temperamental approach reactivity (i.e., impulsivity, frustration, and positive affect) and effortful control (EC; 42 and 54. months) to teachers' reports of academic achievement and popularity (72 and 84. months). Frustration was positively related to achievement and negatively related to popularity for girls, but unrelated to boys' outcomes. Interactions suggested that, among children with high EC or emotional approach (frustration or positive emotion), impulsivity positively predicted achievement. Few gender differences in interactions were noted. These results provide insight into the dynamics relations from temperament/personality to children's academic and social adjustment.

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