Relations between problem-solving styles and psychological adjustment in young adults: Is stress a mediating variable?

Edward C. Chang, Lawrence J. Sanna, Meghan M. Riley, Ann Marie Thornburg, Kathryn M. Zumberg, Michael C. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

To expand on previous research on problem-focused styles of coping in adults (Heppner, Cook, Wright, & Johnson, 1995), we examined the relations between problem-solving styles and psychological adjustment (viz., life satisfaction and psychological symptoms). We also tested to see if stress may account for any associations between problem-focused styles and psychological adjustment. As expected, problem-focused styles were found to be associated with psychological adjustment. However, using latent variable analyses, stress was not found to wholly mediate the associations between problem-focused styles and psychological adjustment. Reactive style was found to have a direct link with psychological symptoms. Overall, these findings point to the importance of considering problem-focused styles in studies of psychological adjustment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-144
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Problem solving
  • Psychological adjustment
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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