Regulation of opiates

Pat Lauderdale, J. Inverarity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the creation of a social problem from behavior previously viewed as within the province of individual preference to the reconceptualization of that behavior as necessitating legal proscription. From a commodity sold in the competitive market, opiates became defined as a social problam ostensibly requiring the most extreme criminal sactions. While interest groups played a decisive role in the creation of opiate legislation, the actions of such groups can be explicated only through reference to the social context, namely, a social structure characterized by an increasingly regulated international and national economy, the rationalization of bureaucratic agencies, and the expansion of formal, rational legal procedures. The analysis provides new insight into the unintended consequences of drug regulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-577
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
Volume14
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Opiate Alkaloids
legal procedure
regulation
Public Opinion
Social Behavior
social problem
Drug and Narcotic Control
Social Problems
national economy
rationalization
Legislation
interest group
social structure
commodity
legislation
drug
market
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Lauderdale, P., & Inverarity, J. (1984). Regulation of opiates. Journal of Drug Issues, 14(3), 567-577.

Regulation of opiates. / Lauderdale, Pat; Inverarity, J.

In: Journal of Drug Issues, Vol. 14, No. 3, 1984, p. 567-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lauderdale, P & Inverarity, J 1984, 'Regulation of opiates', Journal of Drug Issues, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 567-577.
Lauderdale P, Inverarity J. Regulation of opiates. Journal of Drug Issues. 1984;14(3):567-577.
Lauderdale, Pat ; Inverarity, J. / Regulation of opiates. In: Journal of Drug Issues. 1984 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 567-577.
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