Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts

Cameron M. Mercer, Kelsey E. Young, John R. Weirich, Kip Hodges, Bradley L. Jolliff, Jo Anne Wartho, Matthijs Van Soest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt-forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1400050
JournalScience advances
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Chronology
Lasers
Solar System
Isotopes
Heating
zircon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Mercer, C. M., Young, K. E., Weirich, J. R., Hodges, K., Jolliff, B. L., Wartho, J. A., & Van Soest, M. (2015). Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts. Science advances, 1(1), [e1400050]. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1400050

Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts. / Mercer, Cameron M.; Young, Kelsey E.; Weirich, John R.; Hodges, Kip; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Wartho, Jo Anne; Van Soest, Matthijs.

In: Science advances, Vol. 1, No. 1, e1400050, 01.02.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mercer, CM, Young, KE, Weirich, JR, Hodges, K, Jolliff, BL, Wartho, JA & Van Soest, M 2015, 'Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts', Science advances, vol. 1, no. 1, e1400050. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1400050
Mercer, Cameron M. ; Young, Kelsey E. ; Weirich, John R. ; Hodges, Kip ; Jolliff, Bradley L. ; Wartho, Jo Anne ; Van Soest, Matthijs. / Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts. In: Science advances. 2015 ; Vol. 1, No. 1.
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