Refinement and successful implementation of a scoring system for Myxomatosis in a susceptible rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) model

A. Marissa Wolfe, Masmudur Rahman, D. Grant McFadden, Eric C. Bartee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Myxoma virus is a member of Leporipoxviridae whose tropism is tightly restricted to lagomorphs. In susceptible Oryctolagus rabbits, the virus causes a highly lethal disease known as myxomatosis, which begins as a localized infection but rapidly disseminates throughout the animal, leading to immune compromise, mucosal infections, multiorgan failure, and death. In a research setting, myxoma infection of susceptible Oryctolagus cuniculus rabbits is used as a model of poxviral disease progression and represents one of only a few means to study the pathogenesis of this viral family in a native host species. However, the rapid progression of myxomatosis makes accurate prediction of humane endpoints critical to limiting animal pain and distress and preventing death as an endpoint. Here we present case studies of myxomatosis at 2 institutions and offer a refined scoring system to reliably track the course of disease in susceptible rabbits infected with myxoma virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-285
Number of pages6
JournalComparative Medicine
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

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myxomatosis
Oryctolagus cuniculus
Myxoma virus
Viruses
rabbits
Rabbits
disease course
humane endpoints
Oryctolagus
Animals
infection
death
Lagomorpha
tropisms
Infection
distress
endpoints
Myxoma
Tropism
pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Refinement and successful implementation of a scoring system for Myxomatosis in a susceptible rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) model. / Wolfe, A. Marissa; Rahman, Masmudur; McFadden, D. Grant; Bartee, Eric C.

In: Comparative Medicine, Vol. 68, No. 4, 01.08.2018, p. 280-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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