Reducing health care-associated infections (HAIs)

Lessons learned from a national collaborative of regional HAI programs

Catherine Amber Welsh, Mindy E. Flanagan, Shawn C. Hoke, Bradley Doebbeling, Loreen Herwaldt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a leading cause of death in United States health care settings, with an overall estimated annual incidence of 1.7 million. As antimicrobial resistance has increased, so too have efforts to reduce HAI rates. The objective of this study was to identify commonly cited lessons learned across a wide variety of HAI projects and hospital settings. Methods: Thirty-three hospitals participated in 5 different regional collaboratives supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Data on hospitals' successes, challenges, and lessons learned were collected via key informant interviews and structured, standardized case report forms. Results: Seven commonly cited themes were identified: foster change by first understanding resistance; commit to regular strategic communication and join a collaborative; start small and tailor implementation to local needs and cultures; engage frontline staff by involving them in the project and enlisting champions; educate and reeducate; convince administration to provide leadership, funds, and dedicated staff and assign accountability; and provide timely, relevant feedback and celebrate successes. Conclusion: Despite the diversity of hospital settings, cultures, personnel, and HAI reduction projects, we found that hospitals encounter similar challenges and facilitators across projects. We offer a model of 7 process elements shown to be important to successful implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-34
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cross Infection
Health Services Research
Social Responsibility
Financial Management
Cause of Death
Communication
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Incidence

Keywords

  • Health care-associated infection
  • Patient safety
  • Quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Reducing health care-associated infections (HAIs) : Lessons learned from a national collaborative of regional HAI programs. / Welsh, Catherine Amber; Flanagan, Mindy E.; Hoke, Shawn C.; Doebbeling, Bradley; Herwaldt, Loreen.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 40, No. 1, 02.2012, p. 29-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Welsh, Catherine Amber ; Flanagan, Mindy E. ; Hoke, Shawn C. ; Doebbeling, Bradley ; Herwaldt, Loreen. / Reducing health care-associated infections (HAIs) : Lessons learned from a national collaborative of regional HAI programs. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2012 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 29-34.
@article{8b5da1a2a1a84490b6e2c294461e5d3f,
title = "Reducing health care-associated infections (HAIs): Lessons learned from a national collaborative of regional HAI programs",
abstract = "Background: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a leading cause of death in United States health care settings, with an overall estimated annual incidence of 1.7 million. As antimicrobial resistance has increased, so too have efforts to reduce HAI rates. The objective of this study was to identify commonly cited lessons learned across a wide variety of HAI projects and hospital settings. Methods: Thirty-three hospitals participated in 5 different regional collaboratives supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Data on hospitals' successes, challenges, and lessons learned were collected via key informant interviews and structured, standardized case report forms. Results: Seven commonly cited themes were identified: foster change by first understanding resistance; commit to regular strategic communication and join a collaborative; start small and tailor implementation to local needs and cultures; engage frontline staff by involving them in the project and enlisting champions; educate and reeducate; convince administration to provide leadership, funds, and dedicated staff and assign accountability; and provide timely, relevant feedback and celebrate successes. Conclusion: Despite the diversity of hospital settings, cultures, personnel, and HAI reduction projects, we found that hospitals encounter similar challenges and facilitators across projects. We offer a model of 7 process elements shown to be important to successful implementation.",
keywords = "Health care-associated infection, Patient safety, Quality improvement",
author = "Welsh, {Catherine Amber} and Flanagan, {Mindy E.} and Hoke, {Shawn C.} and Bradley Doebbeling and Loreen Herwaldt",
year = "2012",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajic.2011.02.017",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "29--34",
journal = "American Journal of Infection Control",
issn = "0196-6553",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reducing health care-associated infections (HAIs)

T2 - Lessons learned from a national collaborative of regional HAI programs

AU - Welsh, Catherine Amber

AU - Flanagan, Mindy E.

AU - Hoke, Shawn C.

AU - Doebbeling, Bradley

AU - Herwaldt, Loreen

PY - 2012/2

Y1 - 2012/2

N2 - Background: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a leading cause of death in United States health care settings, with an overall estimated annual incidence of 1.7 million. As antimicrobial resistance has increased, so too have efforts to reduce HAI rates. The objective of this study was to identify commonly cited lessons learned across a wide variety of HAI projects and hospital settings. Methods: Thirty-three hospitals participated in 5 different regional collaboratives supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Data on hospitals' successes, challenges, and lessons learned were collected via key informant interviews and structured, standardized case report forms. Results: Seven commonly cited themes were identified: foster change by first understanding resistance; commit to regular strategic communication and join a collaborative; start small and tailor implementation to local needs and cultures; engage frontline staff by involving them in the project and enlisting champions; educate and reeducate; convince administration to provide leadership, funds, and dedicated staff and assign accountability; and provide timely, relevant feedback and celebrate successes. Conclusion: Despite the diversity of hospital settings, cultures, personnel, and HAI reduction projects, we found that hospitals encounter similar challenges and facilitators across projects. We offer a model of 7 process elements shown to be important to successful implementation.

AB - Background: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a leading cause of death in United States health care settings, with an overall estimated annual incidence of 1.7 million. As antimicrobial resistance has increased, so too have efforts to reduce HAI rates. The objective of this study was to identify commonly cited lessons learned across a wide variety of HAI projects and hospital settings. Methods: Thirty-three hospitals participated in 5 different regional collaboratives supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Data on hospitals' successes, challenges, and lessons learned were collected via key informant interviews and structured, standardized case report forms. Results: Seven commonly cited themes were identified: foster change by first understanding resistance; commit to regular strategic communication and join a collaborative; start small and tailor implementation to local needs and cultures; engage frontline staff by involving them in the project and enlisting champions; educate and reeducate; convince administration to provide leadership, funds, and dedicated staff and assign accountability; and provide timely, relevant feedback and celebrate successes. Conclusion: Despite the diversity of hospital settings, cultures, personnel, and HAI reduction projects, we found that hospitals encounter similar challenges and facilitators across projects. We offer a model of 7 process elements shown to be important to successful implementation.

KW - Health care-associated infection

KW - Patient safety

KW - Quality improvement

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84856513165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84856513165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajic.2011.02.017

DO - 10.1016/j.ajic.2011.02.017

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 29

EP - 34

JO - American Journal of Infection Control

JF - American Journal of Infection Control

SN - 0196-6553

IS - 1

ER -