Reduced wind speed improves plant growth in a desert city

Christofer Bang, John Sabo, Stanley H. Faeth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The often dramatic effects of urbanization on community and ecosystem properties, such as primary productivity, abundances, and diversity are now well-established. In most cities local primary productivity increases and this extra energy flows upwards to alter diversity and relative abundances in higher trophic levels. The abiotic mechanisms thought to be responsible for increases in urban productivity are altered temperatures and light regimes, and increased nutrient and water inputs. However, another abiotic factor, wind speed, is also influenced by urbanization and well known for altering primary productivity in agricultural systems. Wind effects on primary productivity have heretofore not been studied in the context of urbanization. Methodology/Principal Findings: We designed a field experiment to test if increased plant growth often observed in cities is explained by the sheltering effects of built structures. Wind speed was reduced by protecting Encelia farinosa (brittlebush) plants in urban, desert remnant and outlying desert localities via windbreaks while controlling for water availability and nutrient content. In all three habitats, we compared E. farinosa growth when protected by experimental windbreaks and in the open. E. farinosa plants protected against ambient wind in the desert and remnant areas grew faster in terms of biomass and height than exposed plants. As predicted, sheltered plants did not differ from unprotected plants in urban areas where wind speed is already reduced. Conclusion/Significance: Our results indicate that reductions in wind speed due to built structures in cities contribute to increased plant productivity and thus also to changes in abundances and diversity of higher trophic levels. Our study emphasizes the need to incorporate wind speed in future urban ecological studies, as well as in planning for green space and sustainable cities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere11061
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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wind speed
deserts
Encelia farinosa
Productivity
plant growth
primary productivity
Urbanization
Growth
urbanization
windbreaks
Nutrients
Ecosystem
Wind effects
Water
energy flow
Food
urban areas
Ecosystems
Biomass
nutrient content

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Reduced wind speed improves plant growth in a desert city. / Bang, Christofer; Sabo, John; Faeth, Stanley H.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 5, No. 6, e11061, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bang, Christofer ; Sabo, John ; Faeth, Stanley H. / Reduced wind speed improves plant growth in a desert city. In: PLoS One. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 6.
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