Reconciliation in a community-based restorative justice intervention

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Truth and Reconciliation Commissions (TRCs) are among the primary means for promoting reconciliation in communities recovering from violent conflict. However, there is a lack of consensus about what reconciliation means or how it is best achieved. In a qualitative study of the first TRC in the U.S., this research interviewed victims of racial violence who participated in the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission (GTRC), a community-based restorative justice intervention. Findings reveal that participants conceptualized reconciliation as a multileveled process, that different concepts of reconciliation influenced assessments of the success and limitations of the GTRC, and indicate how community-based restorative interventions can be improved to contribute to reconciliation in a local setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-96
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Sociology and Social Welfare
Volume39
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2012

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Keywords

  • Peace building
  • Post-conflict reconstruction
  • Reconciliation
  • Restorative justice
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commissions
  • Victims
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Reconciliation in a community-based restorative justice intervention. / Androff, David.

In: Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Vol. 39, No. 4, 2012, p. 73-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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