Recommendations for a culturally relevant internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight young African American women, Alabama, 2010-2011

Nefertiti H. Durant, Rodney Joseph, Andrea Cherrington, Bern Nadette Knight, Dwight Lewis, Yendelela Cuffee, Jeroan J. Allison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Innovative approaches are needed to promote physical activity among young adult overweight and obese African American women. We sought to describe key elements that African American women desire in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight and obese young adult African American women. Methods: A mixed-method approach combining nominal group technique and traditional focus groups was used to elicit recommendations for the development of an Internet-based physical activity promotion tool. Participants, ages 19 to 30 years, were enrolled in a major university. Nominal group technique sessions were conducted to identify themes viewed as key features for inclusion in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool. Confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify and elicit more in-depth information on the themes. Results: Twenty-nine women participated in nominal group (n = 13) and traditional focus group sessions (n = 16). Features that emerged to be included in a culturally relevant Internet-based physical activity promotion tool were personalized website pages, diverse body images on websites and in videos, motivational stories about physical activity and women similar to themselves in size and body shape, tips on hair care maintenance during physical activity, and online social support through social media (eg, Facebook, Twitter). Conclusion: Incorporating existing social media tools and motivational stories from young adult African American women in Internet-based tools may increase the feasibility, acceptability, and success of Internet-based physical activity programs in this high-risk, understudied population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130169
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume11
Issue number2014
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
Internet
Exercise
Focus Groups
Social Media
Young Adult
Body Image
Body Size
Social Support
Hair
Maintenance
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Recommendations for a culturally relevant internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight young African American women, Alabama, 2010-2011. / Durant, Nefertiti H.; Joseph, Rodney; Cherrington, Andrea; Knight, Bern Nadette; Lewis, Dwight; Cuffee, Yendelela; Allison, Jeroan J.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 11, No. 2014, 130169, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Durant, Nefertiti H. ; Joseph, Rodney ; Cherrington, Andrea ; Knight, Bern Nadette ; Lewis, Dwight ; Cuffee, Yendelela ; Allison, Jeroan J. / Recommendations for a culturally relevant internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight young African American women, Alabama, 2010-2011. In: Preventing chronic disease. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 2014.
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